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Cardiovascular disease and risk of incident diabetes mellitus: Findings from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

TitleCardiovascular disease and risk of incident diabetes mellitus: Findings from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).
Publication TypePublication
Year2021
AuthorsMissikpode C, Durazo-Arvizu RA, Cooper RS, OʼBrien MJames, Castañeda SF, Talavera GA, Gallo LC, Llabre MM, Perera MJ, Perreira KM, Ricardo AC, Pirzada A, Lash JP, Daviglus M
JournalJ Diabetes
Volume13
Issue12
Pagination1043-1053
Date Published2021 Dec
ISSN1753-0407
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Studies have reported an association between prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and risk of diabetes mellitus (DM). However, factors that may explain the association remain unclear. We examined the association of prevalent CVD with incident DM and assessed whether weight gain and medication use may explain the association.METHODS: Data from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Visit 1 (2008-2011) and Visit 2 (2014-2017) were used to compare incidence of DM among individuals with and without self-reported CVD at Visit 1. A total of 1899 individuals with self-reported CVD were matched to controls free of self-reported CVD at Visit 1 using 1:1 propensity score matching. Covariates included in the propensity model were sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, comorbid conditions, and study site. The effect of self-reported CVD on incident DM was examined using a generalized estimating equation. The mediating effects of weight gain and use of cardiovascular medications were evaluated.RESULTS: Covariate distributions were similar among individuals with and without self-reported CVD. The incidence of DM among persons with self-reported CVD was 15.3% vs 12.7% among those without self-reported CVD. Compared to individuals without self-reported CVD, individuals with self-reported CVD had a 24% increased risk for incident DM (odds ratio = 1.24, 95% confidence interval = 1.01, 1.51). The association between self-reported CVD and DM was mediated by the use of beta-blockers (proportion explained = 25.4%), statins (proportion explained = 18%), and diuretics (proportion explained = 8%). We found that weight gain did not explain the observed association.CONCLUSIONS: Prevalent cardiovascular disease was associated with a significant increased risk of incident diabetes. The observed association was partially explained by some medications used to manage CVD.

DOI10.1111/1753-0407.13224
Alternate JournalJ Diabetes
PubMed ID34536057
Grant ListP30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0800
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Manuscript Status: 
Published