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Sedentary Behavior and Change in Kidney Function: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)

TitleSedentary Behavior and Change in Kidney Function: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)
Publication TypePublication
Year2021
AuthorsHannan M, Ricardo AC, Cai J, Franceschini N, Kaplan R, Marquez DX, Rosas SE, Schneiderman N, Sotres-Alvarez D, Talavera GA, Daviglus ML, Lash JP
JournalKidney360
Volume2
Issue2
Pagination245-253
Date Published2021 Feb
ISSN2641-7650
Abstract

Background: There is accumulating evidence linking prolonged sedentary time to adverse health outcomes. The effect of sedentary behavior on kidney function has not been evaluated in US Hispanics/Latinos, a population disproportionately affected by CKD.

Methods: We evaluated the association between accelerometer-measured (1 week) sedentary time at baseline and kidney function among 7134 adults without CKD at entry in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), who completed a baseline visit with accelerometry (2008-2011) and a follow-up visit (2014-2017). Outcomes included: () change in kidney function (eGFR and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio, ACR), () incident low eGFR (eGFR

Results: The median sedentary time was 12 hours/d. Over a median follow-up of 6.1 years, the mean relative change in eGFR was -0.50% per year, and there were 167 incident low eGFR events. On multivariable analysis, each 1 hour increase in sedentary time was associated with a longitudinal decline in eGFR (-0.06% per year, 95% CI, -0.10 to -0.02). There was a significant interaction with sex, and on stratified analyses, higher sedentary time was associated with eGFR decline in women but not men. There was no association between sedentary time and the other outcomes.

Conclusions: Sedentary time was associated with a small longitudinal decline in eGFR, which could have important implications in a population that experiences a disproportionate burden of CKD but further investigation is needed.

DOI10.34067/kid.0006202020
Alternate JournalKidney360
PubMed ID34532711
PubMed Central IDPMC8443247
Grant ListHHSN268201300005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300004C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K24 DK092290 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300001C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL134634 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK118736 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300003C / HG / NHGRI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0566
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Manuscript Status: 
Published