Accessibility issues or difficulties with this website?
Call 919-962-2073 or email hchsadministration@unc.edu.

Hepatitis C infection and chronic kidney disease among Hispanics/Latinos.

TitleHepatitis C infection and chronic kidney disease among Hispanics/Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2021
AuthorsWong E, Ricardo AC, Rosas SE, Lash JP, Franceschini N
JournalMedicine (Baltimore)
Volume100
Issue49
Paginatione28089
Date Published2021 Dec 10
ISSN1536-5964
Keywordsalbuminuria, Antiviral Agents, Female, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Hepacivirus, Hepatitis C, Chronic, Hispanic or Latino, Humans, Male, Prospective Studies, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Risk Factors
Abstract

ABSTRACT: Viral infections, including hepatitis C, can cause secondary glomerular nephropathies. Studies suggest that hepatitis C virus infection (HCV+) is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD) but evidence of this relationship is lacking among Hispanics/Latinos. We examined the association between HCV+ and incident CKD in a prospective cohort of Hispanics/Latinos enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. HCV+ was defined by detectable HCV antibodies with additional confirmation through HCV RNA or recombinant immunoblot assay testing. Incident CKD was defined by an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or sex-specific threshold for albuminuria measured during follow-up. We used Poisson regression to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) of CKD and changes in eGFR- or albuminuria-based risk stages, separately. We used linear regression to estimate associations with continuous, annualized changes in eGFR and albuminuria.Over a follow-up period of 5.9 years, 712 incident CKD events occurred among 10,430 participants. After adjustment for demographic characteristics and comorbidities, HCV+ was not associated with incident CKD, defined by eGFR and albuminuria thresholds (IRR 1.29, 95% Confidence Interval 0.61, 2.73). HCV+ was significantly associated with higher eGFR risk stages (IRR 2.39, 95% CI 1.47, 3.61) with most participants transitioning from stage G1 to G2. HCV+ was associated with a continuous, annualized eGFR decline of -0.69 mL/min/m2/year (95% CI -1.23, -0.16). This large, cohort study did not find evidence of a strong association between HCV+ and new-onset CKD among Hispanics/Latinos. HCV infection may not be associated with risk of CKD among Hispanics/Latinos, although treatment with direct-acting antivirals is recommended for all HCV+ individuals, including those with established CKD or end-stage kidney disease.

DOI10.1097/MD.0000000000028089
Alternate JournalMedicine (Baltimore)
PubMed ID34889260
PubMed Central IDPMC8663903
Grant ListHHSN268201300005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300004C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K24 DK092290 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300001C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300004I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300001I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300003C / HG / NHGRI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300002I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K24-DK092290 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300003I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0772
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
Manuscript Status: 
Published