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The association of Step-based metrics and adiposity in the Hispanic community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleThe association of Step-based metrics and adiposity in the Hispanic community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2021
AuthorsSchilsky S, Sotres-Alvarez D, Rosamond WD, Heiss G, Stevens J, Butera N, Cai J, Carlson JA, Cuthbertson C, Daviglus M, LeCroy MN, Pirzada A, Evenson KR
JournalPrev Med Rep
Volume24
Pagination101655
Date Published2021 Dec
ISSN2211-3355
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of accelerometer measured step volume (steps/day) and cadence with adiposity and six-year changes in adiposity in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).METHODS: HCHS/SOL's target population was 60% female with a mean age of 41 years. Cross-sectional (n = 12,353) and longitudinal analyses (n = 9,077) leveraged adjusted complex survey regression models to examine associations between steps/day, and cadence with weight (kg), waist circumference (cm) and body mass index (kg/m). Effect measure modification by covariates was examined.RESULTS: Lower steps/day and intensity was associated with higher adiposity at baseline. Compared to those in the highest quartile of steps/day those in the lowest quartile have 1.42 95% CI (1.19, 1.70) times the odds of obesity. Compared to those in the highest categories of cadence step-based metrics, those in the lowest categories had a 1.62 95% CI (1.36, 1.93), 2.12 95% CI (1.63, 2.75) and 1.41 95% CI (1.16, 1.70) odds of obesity for peak 30-minute cadence, brisk walking and faster ambulation and bouts of purposeful steps and faster ambulation, respectively. Compared to those with the highest stepping cadences, those with the slowest peak 30-minute cadence and fewest minutes in bouts of purposeful steps and faster ambulation had 0.72 95% CI (0.57, 0.89) and 0.82 95% CI (0.60, 1.14) times the odds of gaining weight, respectively.CONCLUSION: Inverse cross-sectional relationships were found for steps/day and cadence and adiposity. Over a six-year period, higher step intensity but not volume was associated with higher odds of gaining weight.

DOI10.1016/j.pmedr.2021.101655
Alternate JournalPrev Med Rep
PubMed ID34976702
PubMed Central IDPMC8684028
Grant ListP30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0951
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
Manuscript Status: 
Published