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Perceived neighborhood factors, health behaviors, and related outcomes in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitlePerceived neighborhood factors, health behaviors, and related outcomes in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2022
AuthorsBayly JE, Panigrahi A, Rodriquez EJ, Gallo LC, Perreira KM, Talavera GA, Estrella ML, Daviglus ML, Castañeda SF, Bainter SA, Chambers EC, Savin KL, Loop M, Pérez-Stable EJ
JournalPrev Med
Volume164
Pagination107267
Date Published2022 Nov
ISSN1096-0260
KeywordsAdult, Binge Drinking, Colonic Neoplasms, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Health Behavior, Hispanic or Latino, Humans, Male, Public Health, Residence Characteristics
Abstract

Hispanic/Latino populations may experience significant neighborhood disadvantage, but limited research has explored whether these factors affect their health behaviors. Associations between perceived neighborhood factors at Visit 1 and health behaviors and related outcomes at Visit 2 in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos were evaluated. Multivariable logistic regression assessed cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between perceived neighborhood social cohesion (NSC, 5 items), and neighborhood problems (NP, 7 items), with cancer screening, current smoking, excessive/binge drinking, hypertension, obesity, physical activity, and poor diet by gender and birthplace. NSC and NP scores were converted into quartiles. Mean age of participants was 42.5 years and 62.1% were women. Perceived NP, but not perceived NSC, differed by gender (p < 0.001). In unstratified models, no significant associations were observed between perceived NSC and any health behavior, whereas greater perceived NP was associated with less adherence to colon cancer screening (moderate level: aOR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.51, 090) and more physical activity (very high level: aOR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06, 1.69) compared to low perceived NP. Women with moderate perceived NP, versus low NP, had a lower odds of colon cancer screening at Visit 1 (aOR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.43, 0.91) and higher odds of mammogram adherence at Visit 2 (aOR = 2.86, 95% CI = 1.44, 5.68). Men with high perceived NP had a higher odds of excessive or binge drinking at Visit 2 (aOR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.19, 3.31). We conclude that perceived NP were significantly related to health behaviors among HCHS/SOL individuals. Perceptions of neighborhood environment may be considered modifiable factors of structural neighborhood environment interventions.

DOI10.1016/j.ypmed.2022.107267
Alternate JournalPrev Med
PubMed ID36150447
PubMed Central IDPMC9691577
Grant ListK01 AG075353 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
L60 MD015551 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
Z99 MD999999 / ImNIH / Intramural NIH HHS / United States
UG3 CA233314 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
U54 CA132384 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
U54 CA132379 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0719
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
NHLBI - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI is the lead NIH sponsor & Project Office for HCHS)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
NHLBI - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI is the lead NIH sponsor & Project Office for HCHS)
Manuscript Status: 
Published