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Immigrant generation status and its association with pubertal timing and tempo among Hispanic girls and boys.

TitleImmigrant generation status and its association with pubertal timing and tempo among Hispanic girls and boys.
Publication TypePublication
Year2023
AuthorsHoughton LC, Paniagua-Avila A, Hua S, Terry MBeth, McDonald JA, Ulanday KT, Van Horn L, Carnethon MR, Isasi CR
JournalAm J Hum Biol
Volume35
Issue10
Paginatione23940
Date Published2023 Oct
ISSN1520-6300
KeywordsAdolescent, Child, Cross-Sectional Studies, Emigrants and Immigrants, Female, Hispanic or Latino, Humans, Male, Menarche, Puberty, United States
Abstract

PURPOSE: In the United States, Hispanic-Latino children reach puberty earlier on average than non-Hispanic white children. Yet among U.S. Hispanic/Latino children, pubertal timing comparisons between immigrant generations have not been made, hence we examined whether pubertal timing differs by immigrant generational status, independent of BMI and acculturation measures.METHODS: Cross-sectional data on 724 boys and 735 girls, aged 10-15 years, from the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino (SOL) Youth, were used to predict the median ages of thelarche, pubarche, and menarche in girls, and pubarche and voice change in boys, using Weibull survival models, while adjusting for SOL center, BMI, and acculturation.RESULTS: In girls, the first generation began thelarche earlier than second and third generations (median age [years] [95% confidence interval]: 7.4 [6.1, 8.8] vs. 8.5 [7.3, 9.7] and 9.1 [7.6, 10.7], respectively), but began menarche later (12.9 [12.0,137] vs. 11.8 [11.0, 12.5] and 11.6 [10.6, 12.6], respectively). Pubertal timing and tempo for boys did not differ by generational status.CONCLUSIONS: First-generation U.S. Hispanic/Latino girls had the earliest thelarche, latest menarche and longest pubertal tempo, compared to second and third generations. Factors beyond BMI and acculturation may account for the differences in pubertal timing by generational status of U.S. Hispanic/Latino girls.

DOI10.1002/ajhb.23940
Alternate JournalAm J Hum Biol
PubMed ID37338197
PubMed Central IDPMC10621780
Grant ListHHSN268201300005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300004C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K07 CA218166 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
K01 CA186943 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300003C / HG / NHGRI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL102130 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300001C / HB / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0446
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Ancillary Study Investigators - Not at HCHS/SOL site
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published