Accessibility issues or difficulties with this website?
Call 919-962-2073 or email hchsadministration@unc.edu.

Characterizing age- and sex-related differences in brain structure among middle-aged and older Hispanic/Latino adults in the study of Latinos- investigation of neurocognitive aging magnetic resonance imaging (SOL-INCA MRI).

TitleCharacterizing age- and sex-related differences in brain structure among middle-aged and older Hispanic/Latino adults in the study of Latinos- investigation of neurocognitive aging magnetic resonance imaging (SOL-INCA MRI).
Publication TypePublication
Year2023
AuthorsStickel AM, Tarraf W, González KA, Ivanovic V, Paredes AMorlett, Zeng D, Cai J, Isasi CR, Kaplan R, Lipton RB, Daviglus M, Testai FD, Lamar M, Gallo LC, Talavera GA, Gellman MD, Ramos AR, González HM, DeCarli C
JournalNeurobiol Aging
Volume126
Pagination58-66
Date Published2023 Jun
ISSN1558-1497
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, aging, Brain, Female, Gray Matter, Hispanic or Latino, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Organ Size
Abstract

Hispanic/Latino adults are a growing segment of the older U.S. population yet are underrepresented in brain aging research. We aimed to characterize brain aging among diverse Hispanic/Latino individuals. Hispanic/Latino individuals (unweighted n = 2273 ages 35-85 years; 56% female) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) population-based study underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as part of the SOL- Investigation of Neurocognitive Aging MRI (SOL-INCA-MRI) ancillary study (2018-2022). We performed linear regressions to calculate age associations with brain volumes for each outcome (total (global) brain, hippocampal, lateral ventricle, total white matter hyperintensity (WMH), individual cortical lobar, and total cortical gray matter) and tested modification by sex. Older age was associated with smaller gray matter volumes and larger lateral ventricle and WMH volumes. Age-related differences in global brain volumes and gray matter volumes in specific regions (i.e., the hippocampus and temporal and occipital lobes) were less pronounced among women. Our findings warrant further investigation into sex-specific mechanisms of brain aging using longitudinal studies.

DOI10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2023.02.007
Alternate JournalNeurobiol Aging
PubMed ID36933278
PubMed Central IDPMC10363333
Grant ListRF1 AG059421 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
K08 AG075351 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG062711 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R25 NS117367 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 AG072972 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
L30 AG074401 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 NS017950 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG048642 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
RF1 AG061022 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 AG062429 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
RF1 AG054548 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG067568 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
P30 AG066546 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG075758 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
U54 CA267789 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
P30 AG010129 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
1033
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published