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Current Family Functioning and Youth Cardiometabolic Health in the SOL Youth Study.

TitleCurrent Family Functioning and Youth Cardiometabolic Health in the SOL Youth Study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2023
AuthorsSuglia SF, Crookes DM, Belak L, Cammack AL, Clark TL, Daviglus M, Gallo LC, Perreira KM, Delamater AM, Isasi CR
JournalInt J Behav Med
Volume30
Issue6
Pagination914-923
Date Published2023 Dec
ISSN1532-7558
KeywordsAdolescent, Biomarkers, Cardiometabolic Risk Factors, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cohort Studies, Female, Hispanic or Latino, Humans, Male, Obesity
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Family functioning may impact children's cardiometabolic health; however, few studies have examined multiple cardiometabolic markers among a diverse racial/ethnic cohort. The relationship between child- and caregiver-reported family functioning and the cardiometabolic health of Hispanic/Latino youth was examined.METHOD: Data were from the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth (SOL Youth) (2012-2014), a population-based cohort study of children and adolescents whose parents participated in the HCHS/SOL (2008-2011). The relationship between youth- and caregiver-rated family functioning, and concordance of ratings is modeled, utilizing the general functioning subscale of the McMaster Family Assessment Device with youth objective cardiometabolic health markers (obesity, central adiposity, prediabetes/diabetes, prehypertension/hypertension, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol) adjusting for sociodemographic factors.RESULTS: Among boys, child/caregiver concordant ineffective family functioning rating was associated with higher cumulative cardiometabolic risk (adjusted B (95% CI): 0.30 (0.04, 0.56)), but no association was observed among girls (adjusted B (95% CI): 0.04 (-0.13, 0.21)). Among girls, ineffective child rating/effective caregiver rating was associated with higher cumulative cardiometabolic risk (adjusted B (95% CI): 0.27 (0.06, 0.48)), but no association was observed among boys (adjusted B (95% CI): 0.02 (-0.23, 0.27).CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that family functioning among this Hispanic/Latino population may influence cardiometabolic risk among youth. Observed differences in the associations by youth sex and concordant/discordant reports of family functioning suggest interventions at the family level, targeting both caregivers and youth, that consider differential sex effects are warranted.

DOI10.1007/s12529-022-10148-9
Alternate JournalInt J Behav Med
PubMed ID36624323
PubMed Central IDPMC10754224
Grant ListHHSN268201300005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300004C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL130025 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001073 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
R01 MD013320 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
R01 MD015204 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
R01HL102130 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL102130 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300001C / HB / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300003C / HG / NHGRI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022-8786 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0821
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Affiliated Investigator - Not at HCHS/SOL site
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
Manuscript Status: 
Published