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Sleep duration and brain MRI measures: Results from the SOL-INCA MRI study.

TitleSleep duration and brain MRI measures: Results from the SOL-INCA MRI study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2024
AuthorsGonzález KA, Tarraf W, Stickel AM, Kaur S, Agudelo C, Redline S, Gallo LC, Isasi CR, Cai J, Daviglus ML, Testai FD, DeCarli C, González HM, Ramos AR
JournalAlzheimers Dement
Volume20
Issue1
Pagination641-651
Date Published2024 Jan
ISSN1552-5279
Keywordsaging, Brain, Gray Matter, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, sleep duration
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Sleep duration has been associated with dementia and stroke. Few studies have evaluated sleep pattern-related outcomes of brain disease in diverse Hispanics/Latinos.METHODS: The SOL-INCA (Study of Latinos-Investigation of Neurocognitive Aging) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study recruited diverse Hispanics/Latinos (35-85 years) who underwent neuroimaging. The main exposure was self-reported sleep duration. Our main outcomes were total and regional brain volumes.RESULTS: The final analytic sample included n = 2334 participants. Increased sleep was associated with smaller brain volume (β  = -0.05, p < 0.01) and consistently so in the 50+ subpopulation even after adjusting for mild cognitive impairment status. Sleeping >9 hours was associated with smaller gray (β  = -0.17, p < 0.05) and occipital matter volumes (β  = -0.18, p < 0.05).DISCUSSION: We found that longer sleep duration was associated with lower total brain and gray matter volume among diverse Hispanics/Latinos across sex and background. These results reinforce the importance of sleep on brain aging in this understudied population.HIGHLIGHTS: Longer sleep was linked to smaller total brain and gray matter volumes. Longer sleep duration was linked to larger white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and smaller hippocampal volume in an obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk group. These associations were consistent across sex and Hispanic/Latino heritage groups.

DOI10.1002/alz.13451
Alternate JournalAlzheimers Dement
PubMed ID37772658
PubMed Central IDPMC10840814
Grant ListRF1 AG061022 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG075758 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG048642 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R56 AG048642 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RF1 AG054548 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG067568 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
1179
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Ancillary Study Investigators - Not at HCHS/SOL site
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published