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Prevalence of infertility and pregnancy loss among individuals with kidney disease in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitlePrevalence of infertility and pregnancy loss among individuals with kidney disease in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2024
AuthorsReynolds ML, Loehr LR, Hogan SL, Hu Y, Isasi CR, Cordero C, Ricardo AC, Lash JP, Derebail VK
JournalWomens Health (Lond)
Volume20
Pagination17455057231224544
Date Published2024 Jan-Dec
ISSN1745-5065
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Female, Hispanic or Latino, Humans, Infertility, Middle Aged, Pregnancy, Prevalence, Public Health, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hispanic/Latino individuals are less likely to receive optimal treatment for chronic kidney disease than non-Hispanic whites. This may be particularly detrimental for women of reproductive age as chronic kidney disease increases risk for infertility, menstrual irregularities, and pregnancy loss. While these maternal outcomes have been associated with advanced chronic kidney disease, their occurrence in early chronic kidney disease is unclear.OBJECTIVES/DESIGN: Using baseline (2008-2011) and second study visit (2014-2017) data from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, we retrospectively assessed the prevalence of chronic kidney disease as well as the association between chronic kidney disease and self-reported infertility, cessation of menses, hysterectomy, and nonviable pregnancy loss (experienced at less than 24 weeks gestation) in women of reproductive age (18-45 years).METHODS: Multivariable survey logistic regression analyses determined the unadjusted and multivariable-adjusted prevalence odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals between chronic kidney disease and the separate outcomes.RESULTS: Among 2589 Hispanic/Latino women included (mean age = 31.4 years), 4.6% were considered to have chronic kidney disease. In adjusted analyses, women with chronic kidney disease did not have a significantly increased odds of infertility (odds ratio = 1.02, 95% confidence interval = 0.42-2.49), cessation of menses (odds ratio = 1.25, 95% confidence interval = 0.52-3.04), or hysterectomy (odds ratio = 1.17, 95% confidence interval = 0.61-2.25) compared to those without chronic kidney disease. In those with chronic kidney disease, the adjusted odds of a nonviable pregnancy loss occurring after baseline visit were increased (odds ratio = 2.11, 95% confidence interval = 0.63-7.02) but not statistically significance.CONCLUSION: The presence of early stage chronic kidney disease did not confer a significant risk of infertility, cessation of menses, or nonviable pregnancy loss.

DOI10.1177/17455057231224544
Alternate JournalWomens Health (Lond)
PubMed ID38279825
PubMed Central IDPMC10822089
Grant ListHHSN268201300005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300004C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 DK007750 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300003C / HG / NHGRI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300001C / HB / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
797
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
Manuscript Status: 
Published