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Prevalence of diabetes among Hispanics/Latinos from diverse backgrounds: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

TitlePrevalence of diabetes among Hispanics/Latinos from diverse backgrounds: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).
Publication TypePublication
Year2014
AuthorsSchneiderman N, Llabre M, Cowie CC, Barnhart J, Carnethon M, Gallo LC, Giachello AL, Heiss G, Kaplan RC, Lavange LM, Teng Y, Villa-Caballero L, M Avilés-Santa L
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume37
Issue8
Pagination2233-9
Date Published2014 Aug
ISSN1935-5548
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Mexican Americans, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Residence Characteristics, Risk Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We examine differences in prevalence of diabetes and rates of awareness and control among adults from diverse Hispanic/Latino backgrounds in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The HCHS/SOL, a prospective, multicenter, population-based study, enrolled from four U.S. metropolitan areas from 2008 to 2011 16,415 18-74-year-old people of Hispanic/Latino descent. Diabetes was defined by either fasting plasma glucose, impaired glucose tolerance 2 h after a glucose load, glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C), or documented use of hypoglycemic agents (scanned medications).RESULTS: Diabetes prevalence varied from 10.2% in South Americans and 13.4% in Cubans to 17.7% in Central Americans, 18.0% in Dominicans and Puerto Ricans, and 18.3% in Mexicans (P < 0.0001). Prevalence related positively to age (P < 0.0001), BMI (P < 0.0001), and years living in the U.S. (P = 0.0010) but was negatively related to education (P = 0.0005) and household income (P = 0.0043). Rate of diabetes awareness was 58.7%, adequate glycemic control (A1C <7%, 53 mmol/mol) was 48.0%, and having health insurance among those with diabetes was 52.4%.CONCLUSIONS: Present findings indicate a high prevalence of diabetes but considerable diversity as a function of Hispanic background. The low rates of diabetes awareness, diabetes control, and health insurance in conjunction with the negative associations between diabetes prevalence and both household income and education among Hispanics/Latinos in the U.S. have important implications for public health policies.

DOI10.2337/dc13-2939
Alternate JournalDiabetes Care
PubMed ID25061138
PubMed Central IDPMC4113173
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK092949 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0005
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published