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Prevalence of suspected nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Hispanic/Latino individuals differs by heritage.

TitlePrevalence of suspected nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Hispanic/Latino individuals differs by heritage.
Publication TypePublication
Year2015
AuthorsKallwitz ER, Daviglus ML, Allison MA, Emory KT, Zhao L, Kuniholm MH, Chen J, Gouskova N, Pirzada A, Talavera GA, Youngblood ME, Cotler SJ
JournalClin Gastroenterol Hepatol
Volume13
Issue3
Pagination569-76
Date Published2015 Mar
ISSN1542-7714
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was shown to disproportionally affect Hispanic persons. We examined the prevalence of suspected NAFLD in Hispanic/Latino persons with diverse backgrounds.METHODS: We studied the prevalence of suspected NAFLD among 12,133 persons included in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. We collected data on levels of aminotransferase, metabolic syndrome (defined by National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines), demographics, and health behaviors. Suspected NAFLD was defined on the basis of increased level of aminotransferase in the absence of serologic evidence for common causes of liver disease or excessive alcohol consumption. In multivariate analyses, data were adjusted for metabolic syndrome, age, acculturation, diet, physical activity, sleep, and levels of education and income.RESULTS: In multivariate analysis, compared with persons of Mexican heritage, persons of Cuban (odds ratio [OR], 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.85), Puerto Rican (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.52-0.87), and Dominican backgrounds (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54-0.93) had lower rates of suspected NAFLD. Persons of Central American and South American heritage had a similar prevalence of suspected NAFLD compared with persons of Mexican heritage. NAFLD was less common in women than in men (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.40-0.60). Suspected NAFLD associated with metabolic syndrome and all 5 of its components.CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of an analysis of a large database of health in Latino populations, we found the prevalence of suspected NAFLD among Hispanic/Latino individuals to vary by region of heritage.

DOI10.1016/j.cgh.2014.08.037
Alternate JournalClin Gastroenterol Hepatol
PubMed ID25218670
PubMed Central IDPMC4333050
Grant ListN01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0119
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published