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Neurocognitive function among middle-aged and older Hispanic/Latinos: results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleNeurocognitive function among middle-aged and older Hispanic/Latinos: results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2015
AuthorsGonzález HM, Tarraf W, Gouskova N, Gallo LC, Penedo FJ, Davis SM, Lipton RB, Arguelles W, Choca JP, Catellier DJ, Mosley TH
JournalArch Clin Neuropsychol
Volume30
Issue1
Pagination68-77
Date Published2015 Feb
ISSN1873-5843
KeywordsAge Factors, Aged, Cognition, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Neuropsychological Tests, regression analysis, Residence Characteristics, Retrospective Studies
Abstract

We sought to examine and describe neurocognitive function among middle-aged and older Hispanic/Latino Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) participants. We analyzed baseline cross-sectional data from the middle-aged and older (ages 45-74 years old) participants (n = 9,063) to calculate neurocognitive function scores and their correlates. Older age and higher depressive symptoms scores were associated with lower average neurocognitive performance, whereas greater educational attainment and household income were associated with higher neurocognitive performance. Hispanic/Latino heritage groups significantly varied in neurocognitive performances. Some neurocognitive differences between Hispanics/Latinos were maintained after controlling for language preference, education, household income, and depressive symptoms. We found notable differences in neurocognitive scores between Hispanic/Latino heritage groups that were not fully explained by the cultural and socioeconomic correlates examined in this study. Further investigations into plausible biological and environmental factors contributing to the Hispanic/Latino heritage group differences in neurocognitive found in the HCHS/SOL are warranted.

DOI10.1093/arclin/acu066
Alternate JournalArch Clin Neuropsychol
PubMed ID25451561
PubMed Central IDPMC4351363
Grant ListT32 HL007426 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0014
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Neurocognitive Reading Center
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published