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Periodontitis and Sleep Disordered Breathing in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitlePeriodontitis and Sleep Disordered Breathing in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2015
AuthorsSanders AE, Essick GK, Beck JD, Cai J, Beaver S, Finlayson TL, Zee PC, Loredo JS, Ramos AR, Singer RH, Jimenez MC, Barnhart JM, Redline S
JournalSleep
Volume38
Issue8
Pagination1195-203
Date Published2015 Aug 01
ISSN1550-9109
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, C-Reactive Protein, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Periodontitis, regression analysis, Residence Characteristics, Risk Factors, sleep, Sleep Apnea Syndromes, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and severe chronic periodontitis.DESIGN: Cross-sectional data analysis from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.SETTING: Community-based setting with probability sampling from four urban US communities.PARTICIPANTS: 12,469 adults aged 18-74 y.INTERVENTIONS: None.MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Severe chronic periodontitis was defined using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/American Academy of Periodontology case classification based on full-mouth periodontal assessments performed by calibrated dentists. SDB was evaluated in standardized home sleep tests, and defined as the number of apnea plus hypopnea events associated with ≥ 3% desaturation, per hour of estimated sleep. SDB was quantified using categories of the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): 0.0 events (nonapneic); 0.1-4.9 (subclinical); 5.0-14.9 (mild); and ≥ 15 (moderate/severe). Covariates were demographic characteristics and established periodontitis risk factors. C-reactive protein was a potential explanatory variable. Using survey estimation, multivariable binary logistic regression estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence limits (CL). Following adjustment for confounding, the SDB and periodontitis relationship remained statistically significant, but was attenuated in strength and no longer dose-response. Compared with the nonapneic referent, adjusted odds of severe periodontitis were 40% higher with subclinical SDB (OR = 1.4, 95% CL: 1.0, 1.9), 60% higher with mild SDB (OR = 1.6, 95% CL: 1.1, 2.2) and 50% higher with moderate/severe SDB (OR = 1.5, 95% CL: 1.0, 2.3) demonstrating an independent association between SDB and severe periodontitis.CONCLUSIONS: This study identifies a novel association between mild sleep disordered breathing and periodontitis that was most pronounced in young adults.

DOI10.5665/sleep.4890
Alternate JournalSleep
PubMed ID25669183
PubMed Central IDPMC4507724
Grant ListKL2 TR000461 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0091
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published