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Chronic stress, inflammation, and glucose regulation in U.S. Hispanics from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

TitleChronic stress, inflammation, and glucose regulation in U.S. Hispanics from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2015
AuthorsMcCurley JL, Mills PJ, Roesch SC, Carnethon M, Giacinto RE, Isasi CR, Teng Y, Sotres-Alvarez D, Llabre MM, Penedo FJ, Schneiderman N, Gallo LC
JournalPsychophysiology
Volume52
Issue8
Pagination1071-9
Date Published2015 Aug
ISSN1540-5958
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Blood Glucose, Female, Glucose Intolerance, Glucose Tolerance Test, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Inflammation, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Stress, Psychological, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

Diabetes prevalence is rising rapidly, and diabetes disproportionately affects Hispanics and other underserved groups. Chronic stress may contribute to diabetes risk, but few studies have examined this relationship in U.S. Hispanics. We examined associations of chronic stress with fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Hispanics without diabetes, and also assessed indirect effects of stress through inflammation (CRP). Participants were 3,923 men and women, aged 18-74, without diabetes, from the four U.S. field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary study. Participants completed a measure of chronic life stress and a physical exam with oral glucose tolerance test. In a multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for demographic and health covariates, higher chronic stress was related to higher fasting glucose (standardized regression coefficient: β = .09, p < .01), postload glucose (β = .07, p < .05), and HbA1c levels (β = .08, p < .01). However, there was no indirect effect of stress through inflammation. Findings suggest that higher chronic stress is associated with poorer glucose regulation in Hispanics, prior to the onset of a clinical diabetes diagnosis.

DOI10.1111/psyp.12430
Alternate JournalPsychophysiology
PubMed ID25898909
PubMed Central IDPMC4640890
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RC2HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001073 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RC2 HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0208
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published