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Is acculturation related to obesity in Hispanic/Latino adults? Results from the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos.

TitleIs acculturation related to obesity in Hispanic/Latino adults? Results from the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2015
AuthorsIsasi CR, Ayala GX, Sotres-Alvarez D, Madanat H, Penedo F, Loria CM, Elder JP, Daviglus ML, Barnhart J, Siega-Riz AMaria, Van Horn L, Schneiderman N
JournalJ Obes
Volume2015
Pagination186276
Date Published2015
ISSN2090-0716
KeywordsAcculturation, Adult, Age Distribution, Aged, Community Health Centers, Cross-Sectional Studies, Environmental Exposure, Female, Health Behavior, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Sex Distribution, Social Environment, Socioeconomic Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires, United States
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The study examined the association of obesity with acculturation in a large and diverse sample of US Hispanic/Latino adults.METHODS: The Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS)/Study of Latinos (SOL) is a community-based cohort study of Hispanic/Latino adults aged 18-74 years (N = 16,415) from four urban areas. Height and weight were directly measured using a standardized protocol. Acculturation was assessed by the Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics (SASH). Other immigration related variables included place of birth, length of residency in the US, and age at immigration. Odds ratios were calculated to assess the association of overweight, moderate obesity, and extreme obesity (≥40 kg/m(2)) with acculturation and sociodemographic variables.RESULTS: The prevalence of obesity was 42.4% for women and 36.5% for men and varied by field center and Hispanic/Latino background. The strongest predictor of moderate and extreme obesity was length of residency in mainland US. This association was consistent across Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. Acculturation was not significantly associated with obesity.DISCUSSION: The burden of obesity is high among Hispanic/Latino adults. The study findings suggest that prolonged exposure to the environments in these communities, rather than acculturation, is an important risk factor for obesity in this population.

DOI10.1155/2015/186276
Alternate JournalJ Obes
PubMed ID25893114
PubMed Central IDPMC4393894
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001073 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0007
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published