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Family Environment and the Metabolic Syndrome: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study (SCAS).

TitleFamily Environment and the Metabolic Syndrome: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study (SCAS).
Publication TypePublication
Year2015
AuthorsPenedo FJ, Brintz CE, Llabre MM, Arguelles W, Isasi CR, Arredondo EM, Navas-Nacher EL, Perreira KM, González HM, Rodriguez CJ, Daviglus M, Schneiderman N, Gallo LC
JournalAnn Behav Med
Volume49
Issue6
Pagination793-801
Date Published2015 Dec
ISSN1532-4796
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Family, Family Relations, Female, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Metabolic syndrome, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Social Environment
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Very limited work has evaluated associations of sociocultural processes with prevalence of the MetS.PURPOSE: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate associations between family environment (cohesion/conflict) and the MetS, in a multi-site sample of US Hispanics/Latinos.METHODS: A total of 3278 participants from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos underwent a clinical exam and completed psychosocial measures including family environment (cohesion and conflict) as part of the Sociocultural Ancillary Study.RESULTS: The association between family environment and the MetS was moderated by sex. Among all women, higher family conflict was associated with MetS prevalence. Results by ancestry group showed that only among Cuban women, higher conflict was associated with the MetS, whereas only among Dominican men, greater cohesion was associated with the MetS.CONCLUSIONS: The family context may be a sociocultural protective or risk factor among Hispanics/Latinos in terms of MetS risk, but these associations may vary by sex and Hispanic background.

DOI10.1007/s12160-015-9713-4
Alternate JournalAnn Behav Med
PubMed ID26068057
PubMed Central IDPMC4636468
Grant ListR01 HL104199 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007426 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001073 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RC2 HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
1 RC2 HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0060
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published