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The Role of Stress in Understanding Differences in Sedentary Behavior in Hispanic/Latino Adults: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

TitleThe Role of Stress in Understanding Differences in Sedentary Behavior in Hispanic/Latino Adults: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2016
AuthorsVásquez E, Strizich G, Gallo L, Marshall SJ, Merchant GC, Murillo R, Penedo FJ, Salazar C, Sotres-Alvarez D, Shaw BA, Isasi CR
JournalJ Phys Act Health
Volume13
Issue3
Pagination310-7
Date Published2016 Mar
ISSN1543-5474
KeywordsAccelerometry, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, California, Chronic Disease, Female, Health Behavior, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Life Change Events, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Sedentary Behavior, Self Report, Socioeconomic Factors, Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Stress, Psychological, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Chronic stress and/or lifetime traumatic stress can create a self-reinforcing cycle of unhealthy behaviors, such as overeating and sedentary behavior, that can lead to further increases in stress. This study examined the relationship between stress and sedentary behavior in a sample of Hispanic/Latino adults (N = 4244) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study.METHODS: Stress was measured as the number of ongoing difficulties lasting 6 months or more and as lifetime exposure to traumatic events. Sedentary behavior was measured by self-report and with accelerometer. Multivariable regression models examined associations of stress measures with time spent in sedentary behaviors adjusting by potential confounders.RESULTS: Those who reported more than one chronic stressor spent, on average, 8 to 10 additional minutes per day in objectively measured sedentary activities (P < .05), whereas those with more than one lifetime traumatic stressor spent (after we adjusted for confounders) 10 to 14 additional minutes in sedentary activities (P < .01) compared with those who did not report any stressors. Statistical interactions between the 2 stress measures and age or sex were not significant.CONCLUSION: Interventions aimed at reducing sedentary behaviors might consider incorporating stress reduction into their approaches.

DOI10.1123/jpah.2014-0608
Alternate JournalJ Phys Act Health
PubMed ID26181079
PubMed Central IDPMC4985239
Grant ListN01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RC2 HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0179
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Affiliated Investigator - Not at HCHS/SOL site
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published