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Comparing measures of overall and central obesity in relation to cardiometabolic risk factors among US Hispanic/Latino adults.

TitleComparing measures of overall and central obesity in relation to cardiometabolic risk factors among US Hispanic/Latino adults.
Publication TypePublication
Year2015
AuthorsQi Q, Strizich G, Hanna DB, Giacinto RE, Castañeda SF, Sotres-Alvarez D, Pirzada A, Llabre MM, Schneiderman N, Avilés-Santa LM, Kaplan RC
JournalObesity (Silver Spring)
Volume23
Issue9
Pagination1920-8
Date Published2015 Sep
ISSN1930-739X
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Body mass index, Comorbidity, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Dyslipidemias, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Abdominal, Prevalence, Risk Factors, United States, Waist-Hip Ratio, Young Adult
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: US Hispanics/Latinos have high prevalence of obesity and related comorbidities. We compared overall and central obesity measures in associations with cardiometabolic outcomes among US Hispanics/Latinos.METHODS: Multivariable regression assessed cross-sectional relationships of six obesity measures with cardiometabolic outcomes among 16,415 Hispanics/Latinos aged 18-74 years.RESULTS: BMI was moderately correlated with waist-to-hip ratio (WHR; women, r = 0.37; men, r = 0.58) and highly correlated with other obesity measures (r ≥ 0.87) (P < 0.0001). All measures of obesity were correlated with unfavorable levels of glycemic traits, blood pressure, and lipids, with similar r-estimates for each obesity measure (P < 0.05). Multivariable-adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) for diabetes (women, 6.7 [3.9, 11.5]; men, 3.9 [2.2, 6.9]), hypertension (women, 2.4 [1.9, 3.1]; men, 2.5 [1.9, 3.4]), and dyslipidemia (women, 2.1 [1.8, 2.4]; men, 2.2 [1.9, 2.6]) were highest for individuals characterized as overweight/obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2)) and with abnormal WHR (women ≥0.85; men, ≥0.90), compared with those with normal BMI and WHR (P < 0.0001). Among normal-weight individuals, abnormal WHR was associated with increased cardiometabolic condition prevalence (P < 0.05), particularly diabetes (women, PR = 4.0 [2.2, 7.1]; men, PR = 3.0 [1.6, 5.7]).CONCLUSIONS: Obesity measures were associated with cardiometabolic risk factors to a similar degree in US Hispanics/Latinos. WHR is useful to identify individuals with normal BMI at increased cardiometabolic risk.

DOI10.1002/oby.21176
Alternate JournalObesity (Silver Spring)
PubMed ID26260150
PubMed Central IDPMC4551609
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001073 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0285
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published