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Self-Reported Cancer Prevalence among Hispanics in the US: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleSelf-Reported Cancer Prevalence among Hispanics in the US: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2016
AuthorsPenedo FJ, Yanez B, Castañeda SF, Gallo L, Wortman K, Gouskova N, Simon M, Arguelles W, Llabre M, Sanchez-Johnsen L, Brintz C, Gonzalez P, Van Horn L, Rademaker AW, Ramirez AG
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue1
Paginatione0146268
Date Published2016
ISSN1932-6203
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, California, Central America, Chicago, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Female, Florida, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, New York City, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Puerto Rico, Self Report, Sex Distribution, South America, Urban Population, Young Adult
Abstract

Cancer has surpassed heart disease as the leading cause of death among Hispanics in the U.S., yet data on cancer prevalence and risk factors in Hispanics in regard to ancestry remain scarce. This study sought to describe (a) the prevalence of cancer among Hispanics from four major U.S. metropolitan areas, (b) cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry, and (c) identify correlates of self-reported cancer prevalence. Participants were 16,415 individuals from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central or South American. All data were collected at a single time point during the HCHS/SOL baseline clinic visit. The overall self-reported prevalence rate of cancer for the population was 4%. The rates varied by Hispanic ancestry group, with individuals of Cuban and Puerto Rican ancestry reporting the highest cancer prevalence. For the entire population, older age (OR = 1.47, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.26-1.71) and having health insurance (OR = 1.93, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.42-2.62) were all significantly associated with greater prevalence, whereas male sex was associated with lower prevalence (OR = 0.56, p < .01, 95% CI, .40-.79). Associations between study covariates and cancer prevalence also varied by Hispanic ancestry. Findings underscore the importance of sociodemographic factors and health insurance in relation to cancer prevalence for Hispanics and highlight variations in cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry groups. Characterizing differences in cancer prevalence rates and their correlates is critical to the development and implementation of effective prevention strategies across distinct Hispanic ancestry groups.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0146268
Alternate JournalPLoS One
PubMed ID26808047
PubMed Central IDPMC4726570
Grant ListU01 CA114657-05 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
U54 CA153511 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
(N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001422 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
(N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
1 RC2 HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 CA114657 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
U54 CA202995 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
P30 CA060553 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U54 CA202997 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
RC2 HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0199
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published