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Differences in Hemoglobin A1c Between Hispanics/Latinos and Non-Hispanic Whites: An Analysis of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos and the 2007-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

TitleDifferences in Hemoglobin A1c Between Hispanics/Latinos and Non-Hispanic Whites: An Analysis of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos and the 2007-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
Publication TypePublication
Year2016
AuthorsM Avilés-Santa L, Hsu LL, Arredondo M, Menke A, Werner E, Thyagarajan B, Heiss G, Teng Y, Schneiderman N, Giachello AL, Gallo LC, Talavera GA, Cowie CC
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume39
Issue6
Pagination1010-7
Date Published2016 Jun
ISSN1935-5548
KeywordsAdult, Blood Glucose, Central America, Cross-Sectional Studies, Cuba, Diabetes Mellitus, European Continental Ancestry Group, Fasting, Female, Glucose Tolerance Test, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Mexican Americans, Mexico, Middle Aged, Nutrition Surveys, Prediabetic State, Puerto Rico, South America
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether, after adjustment for glycemia and other selected covariates, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) differed among adults from six Hispanic/Latino heritage groups (Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and South American) and between Hispanic/Latino and non-Hispanic white adults without self-reported diabetes.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from 13,083 individuals without self-reported diabetes from six Hispanic/Latino heritage groups, enrolled from 2008 to 2011 in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, and 2,242 non-Hispanic white adults enrolled during the 2007-2012 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We compared HbA1c levels among Hispanics/Latinos and between Hispanics/Latinos and non-Hispanic whites before and after adjustment for age, sex, fasting (FPG) and 2-h post-oral glucose tolerance test (2hPG) glucose, anthropometric measurements, and selected biochemical and hematologic variables and after stratification by diabetes status: unrecognized diabetes (FPG ≥7.1 mmol/L or 2hPG ≥11.2 mmol/L), prediabetes (FPG 5.6-7.0 mmol/L or 2hPG 7.8-11.1 mmol/L), and normal glucose tolerance (FPG <5.6 mmol/L and 2hPG <7.8 mmol/L).RESULTS: Adjusted mean HbA1c differed significantly across all seven groups (P < 0.001). Non-Hispanic whites had significantly lower HbA1c (P < 0.05) than each individual Hispanic/Latino heritage group. Upon stratification by diabetes status, statistically significant differences (P < 0.001) in adjusted mean HbA1c persisted across all seven groups.CONCLUSIONS: HbA1c differs among Hispanics/Latinos of diverse heritage groups and between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics/Latinos after adjustment for glycemia and other covariates. The clinical significance of these differences is unknown.

DOI10.2337/dc15-2579
Alternate JournalDiabetes Care
PubMed ID27208330
PubMed Central IDPMC5317242
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0129
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
NHLBI - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI is the lead NIH sponsor & Project Office for HCHS)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published