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Factor structure of the Perceived Stress Scale-10 (PSS) across English and Spanish language responders in the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

TitleFactor structure of the Perceived Stress Scale-10 (PSS) across English and Spanish language responders in the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsPerera MJ, Brintz CE, Birnbaum-Weitzman O, Penedo FJ, Gallo LC, Gonzalez P, Gouskova N, Isasi CR, Navas-Nacher EL, Perreira KM, Roesch SC, Schneiderman N, Llabre MM
JournalPsychol Assess
Volume29
Issue3
Pagination320-328
Date Published2017 03
ISSN1939-134X
KeywordsAdult, Anger, Anxiety, Depression, Factor Analysis, Statistical, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, psychometrics, Reproducibility of Results, Stress, Psychological, Surveys and Questionnaires, Translations, United States
Abstract

Despite widespread use, psychometric investigation of the original English and translated Spanish versions of the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS; Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) has been limited among the U.S. Hispanic/Latino population. The present study examined the factor structure, factorial invariance, and reliability and validity of PSS scores from English and Spanish versions using data from 5,176 Hispanics/Latinos who participated in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study. The total sample and language multigroup confirmatory factor analyses supported a bifactor model with all 10 PSS items loading on a general perceived stress factor, and the 4 reverse-worded items also loading on a reverse-worded factor. Internal consistency ranged from .68 to .78, and it was indicated that reliable variance exists beyond the general perceived stress factor. The model displayed configural, metric, scalar, and residual invariance across language groups. Convergent validity analyses indicated that both the general perceived stress factor and the reverse-worded factor were related to scores of depression, anxiety, and anger in the expected directions. The reverse-worded factor added to the validity of the PSS beyond the general perceived stress factor. The total computed score of the PSS can be recommended for use with Hispanics/Latinos in the United States that complete the measure in English or Spanish and the reverse-worded factor can enhance prediction. (PsycINFO Database Record

DOI10.1037/pas0000336
Alternate JournalPsychol Assess
PubMed ID27280744
PubMed Central IDPMC5148735
Grant ListN01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007426 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 CA060553 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RC2 HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0094
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published