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Alcohol Consumption and Metabolic Syndrome Among Hispanics/Latinos: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleAlcohol Consumption and Metabolic Syndrome Among Hispanics/Latinos: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2016
AuthorsVidot DC, Stoutenberg M, Gellman M, Arheart KL, Teng Y, Daviglus ML, González HM, Talavera G, Isasi CR, Heiss G, Schneiderman N
JournalMetab Syndr Relat Disord
Volume14
Issue7
Pagination354-62
Date Published2016 09
ISSN1557-8518
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Alcohol Drinking, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Metabolic syndrome, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The association between alcohol consumption and metabolic syndrome (MetS) among Hispanic/Latino populations has not been studied in great detail. Our study examined the relationship between alcohol consumption and MetS among U.S. Hispanics/Latinos and explored whether this relationship varied by age, body mass index, gender, and Hispanic/Latino backgrounds.METHODS: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) is a multisite, prospective, population-based, cohort study of Hispanics/Latinos, ages 18-74 years from four U.S. communities. Participants were categorized into never, former, occasional, low, moderate, and high alcohol consumption categories. A cross-sectional analysis of 15,905 participants with complete data was conducted. Survey design appropriate chi-squared and logistic regression models were run to detect significant associations between alcohol consumption categories and cases of MetS.RESULTS: Almost half (47.4%) of the sample was classified as occasional, low, moderate, or heavy drinkers. Low and moderate alcohol consumers had lower odds of MetS than never drinkers. Low and heavy drinkers had higher odds of presenting with elevated central obesity, while occasional, low, moderate, and heavy drinkers had higher odds of having low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels compared to never drinkers. Low and moderate wine drinkers had lower odds of MetS compared to never drinkers. There were no significant findings among beer or liquor drinkers, or with binge drinking after model adjustments.CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that low and moderate alcohol consumption may lower the odds of MetS in a sample of Hispanic/Latino adults, but that the relationship of alcohol consumption varies with the individual components of MetS.

DOI10.1089/met.2015.0171
Alternate JournalMetab Syndr Relat Disord
PubMed ID27304318
PubMed Central IDPMC5011615
Grant ListN01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
KL2 TR000461 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007426 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK020541 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0112
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published