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Ocular screening adherence across Hispanic/Latino heritage groups with diabetes: results from the Ocular SOL ancillary to the Miami site of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

TitleOcular screening adherence across Hispanic/Latino heritage groups with diabetes: results from the Ocular SOL ancillary to the Miami site of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).
Publication TypePublication
Year2016
AuthorsTannenbaum SL, McClure LA, D Zheng D, Lam BL, Arheart KL, Joslin CE, Talavera GA, Lee DJ
JournalBMJ Open Diabetes Res Care
Volume4
Issue1
Paginatione000236
Date Published2016
ISSN2052-4897
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence and correlates of ocular screening adherence among select Hispanics/Latinos living with diabetes.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data were obtained through an ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (Miami site). Participants included Hispanics/Latinos aged 40+ years who underwent a baseline examination/risk factor assessment (2008-2011) and then completed a survey on vision health/knowledge (conducted October 2011-September 2013; sample n=1235; diabetic subsample=264). The dependent variable was having a dilated eye examination within the past 12 months. Covariate candidate selection for entry into sequential multivariable logistic regression models was guided by Anderson's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use and the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations.RESULTS: Participants aged 65+ were more likely to have dilated eye examinations (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.22 to 5.60) compared with those aged 40-54 years. Participants less likely to have dilated examinations had a high school degree or general educational development (GED) (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.96, compared to no degree) and those currently uninsured or never insured ((OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.83) and (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.51)) compared to those currently insured. Participants who heard or saw something about eye health from two or more sources (eg, media outlets, doctor's office, relatives/friends) compared to those who reported no sources in the past 12 months were more likely to have a dilated eye examination (OR 2.82, 95% CI 1.26 to 6.28).CONCLUSIONS: Lack of health insurance is strongly associated with low screening uptake in Hispanics/Latinos living with diabetes. Health promotion strategies stressing the importance of annual dilated eye examinations and increasing sources of information on eye health are other potential strategies to increase screening uptake in Hispanics/Latinos.

DOI10.1136/bmjdrc-2016-000236
Alternate JournalBMJ Open Diabetes Res Care
PubMed ID27547415
PubMed Central IDPMC4985913
Grant ListU58 DP002655 / DP / NCCDPHP CDC HHS / United States
U58 DP002653 / DP / NCCDPHP CDC HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U58 DP002652 / DP / NCCDPHP CDC HHS / United States
U58 DP002651 / DP / NCCDPHP CDC HHS / United States
MS#: 
0379
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published