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Actigraphic Sleep Patterns of U.S. Hispanics: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleActigraphic Sleep Patterns of U.S. Hispanics: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsDudley KA, Weng J, Sotres-Alvarez D, Simonelli G, Feliciano ECespedes, Ramirez M, Ramos AR, Loredo JS, Reid KJ, Mossavar-Rahmani Y, Zee PC, Chirinos DA, Gallo LC, Wang R, Patel SR
JournalSleep
Volume40
Issue2
Date Published2017 Feb 01
ISSN1550-9109
Keywordsactigraphy, Adult, Aged, Community Health Services, Comorbidity, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Mexican Americans, Mexico, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Puerto Rico, Risk Factors, sleep, Social Class, United States
Abstract

Study objective: To assess the extent to which objective sleep patterns vary among U.S. Hispanics/Latinos.Methods: We assessed objective sleep patterns in 2087 participants of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos from 6 Hispanic/Latino subgroups aged 18-64 years who underwent 7 days of wrist actigraphy.Results: The age- and sex-standardized mean (SE) sleep duration was 6.82 (0.05), 6.72 (0.07), 6.61 (0.07), 6.59 (0.06), 6.57 (0.10), and 6.44 (0.09) hr among individuals of Mexican, Cuban, Dominican, Central American, Puerto Rican, and South American heritage, respectively. Sleep maintenance efficiency ranged from 89.2 (0.2)% in Mexicans to 86.5 (0.4)% in Puerto Ricans, while the sleep fragmentation index ranged from 19.7 (0.3)% in Mexicans to 24.2 (0.7)% in Puerto Ricans. In multivariable models adjusted for age, sex, season, socioeconomic status, lifestyle habits, and comorbidities, these differences persisted.Conclusions: There are important differences in actigraphically measured sleep across U.S. Hispanic/Latino heritages. Individuals of Mexican heritage have longer and more consolidated sleep, while those of Puerto Rican heritage have shorter and more fragmented sleep. These differences may have clinically important effects on health outcomes.

DOI10.1093/sleep/zsw049
Alternate JournalSleep
PubMed ID28364514
PubMed Central IDPMC6251655
Grant ListK24 HL127307 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
F32 HL124767 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
KL2 TR000461 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / WHI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007901 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
L60 MD005231 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL098297 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0265
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Archived formerly HCHS/SOL associated persons
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Sleep Center - Harvard Medical School/The Brigham & Women's Hospital
Manuscript Status: 
Published