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Psychosocial Factors in the Relationship between Socioeconomic Status and Cardiometabolic Risk: the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

TitlePsychosocial Factors in the Relationship between Socioeconomic Status and Cardiometabolic Risk: the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsMcCurley JL, Penedo F, Roesch SC, Isasi CR, Carnethon M, Sotres-Alvarez D, Schneiderman N, Gonzalez P, Chirinos DA, Camacho A, Teng Y, Gallo LC
JournalAnn Behav Med
Volume51
Issue4
Pagination477-488
Date Published2017 Aug
ISSN1532-4796
KeywordsAdult, Cross-Sectional Studies, Depression, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Metabolic syndrome, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Social Class, social support, United States
Abstract

BACKGROUND: U.S. Hispanics/Latinos display a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), a group of co-occurring cardiometabolic risk factors (abdominal obesity, impaired fasting glucose, dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure) associated with higher cardiovascular disease and mortality risk. Low socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with higher risk for MetSyn in Hispanics/Latinos, and psychosocial factors may play a role in this relationship.PURPOSE: This cross-sectional study examined psychosocial factors in the association of SES and MetSyn components in 4,996 Hispanic/Latino adults from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study.METHODS: MetSyn components were measured at the baseline examination. Participants completed interviews to determine psychosocial risks (e.g., depression) and resources (e.g., social support) within 9 months of baseline (< 4 months in 72.6% of participants). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM) were used to identify latent constructs and examine associations.RESULTS: Participant mean age was 41.7 years (SE = 0.4) and 62.7% were female. CFA identified single latent factors for SES and psychosocial indicators, and three factors for MetSyn [blood pressure, lipids, metabolic factors]. SEMs showed that lower SES was related to MetSyn factors indirectly through higher psychosocial risk/lower resources (Y-Bχ (df = 420) = 4412.90, p < .05, RMSEA = .042, SRMR = .051). A statistically significant effect consistent with mediation was found from lower SES to higher metabolic risk (glucose/waist circumference) via psychosocial risk/resource variables (Mackinnon's 95% asymmetric CI = -0.13 to -0.02).CONCLUSIONS: SES is related to metabolic variables indirectly through psychosocial factors in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos of diverse ancestries.

DOI10.1007/s12160-016-9871-z
Alternate JournalAnn Behav Med
PubMed ID28130624
PubMed Central IDPMC5529279
Grant ListN01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R25 TW009343 / TW / FIC NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /
UL1 TR001114 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /
N01-HC65233 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /
5T32HL079891-06 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RC2 HL101649 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /
UL1 RR025774 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL079891 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RC2 HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R25 TW009343 / / Fogarty International Center /
N01-HC65235 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /
MS#: 
0175
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
Manuscript Status: 
Published