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Effect of Relocation to the U.S. on Asthma Risk Among Hispanics.

TitleEffect of Relocation to the U.S. on Asthma Risk Among Hispanics.
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsJerschow E, Strizich G, Xue X, Hudes G, Spivack S, Persky V, Ayala GX, Delamater A, Kim Y, Etzel E, Cai J, Kaplan RC
JournalAm J Prev Med
Volume52
Issue5
Pagination579-588
Date Published2017 May
ISSN1873-2607
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Age Distribution, Aged, asthma, Cross-Sectional Studies, Emigrants and Immigrants, Emigration and Immigration, Environment, Female, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Mexican Americans, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Prevalence, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Sex Distribution, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Asthma prevalence is reportedly higher among U.S.-born relative to foreign-born Hispanics/Latinos. Little is known about rates of asthma onset before and after relocation to the U.S. in Latinos. Asthma rates were examined by U.S. residence and country/territory of origin.METHODS: In 2015-2016, age at first onset of asthma symptoms was analyzed, defined retrospectively from a cross-sectional survey in 2008-2011, in relation to birthplace and U.S. residence among 15,573 U.S.-dwelling participants (aged 18-76 years) in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.RESULTS: Cumulative incidence of asthma through age 30 years ranged from 7.9% among Mexican background individuals to 29.4% among those of Puerto Rican background. Among those born outside the U.S. mainland, the adjusted hazard for asthma was 1.52-fold higher (95% CI=1.25, 1.85) after relocation versus before relocation to the U.S. mainland, with heterogeneity in this association by Hispanic/Latino background (p-interaction<0.0001). Among foreign-born Dominicans and Mexicans, rates of asthma were greater after relocation versus before relocation (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] for after versus before relocation, 2.42, 95% CI=1.44, 4.05 among Dominicans; AHR=2.90, 95% CI=2.02, 4.16 among Mexicans). Puerto Ricans had modestly increased asthma onset associated with U.S. mainland residence (AHR=1.52, 95% CI=1.06, 2.17). No similar increase associated with U.S. residence was observed among Central/South American immigrants (AHR=0.94, 95% CI=0.53, 1.67). Asthma rates among Cuban immigrants were lower after relocation (AHR=0.45, 95% CI=0.24, 0.82).CONCLUSIONS: The effect of relocation to the U.S. on asthma risk among Hispanics is not uniform across Hispanic/Latino groups.

DOI10.1016/j.amepre.2016.12.018
Alternate JournalAm J Prev Med
PubMed ID28162842
PubMed Central IDPMC5401659
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
KL2 TR001071 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001073 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 CA013330 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0165
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
Manuscript Status: 
Published