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Applying recovery biomarkers to calibrate self-report measures of sodium and potassium in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleApplying recovery biomarkers to calibrate self-report measures of sodium and potassium in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsMossavar-Rahmani Y, Sotres-Alvarez D, Wong WW, Loria CM, Gellman MD, Van Horn L, Alderman MH, Beasley JM, Lora CM, Siega-Riz AM, Kaplan RC, Shaw PA
JournalJ Hum Hypertens
Volume31
Issue7
Pagination462-473
Date Published2017 07
ISSN1476-5527
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Biomarkers, calibration, Cohort Studies, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Potassium, Dietary, Self Report, Sodium, Dietary, Young Adult
Abstract

Measurement error in assessment of sodium and potassium intake obscures associations with health outcomes. The level of this error in a diverse US Hispanic/Latino population is unknown. We investigated the measurement error in self-reported dietary intake of sodium and potassium and examined differences by background (Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican and South American). In 2010-2012, we studied 447 participants aged 18-74 years from four communities (Miami, Bronx, Chicago and San Diego), obtaining objective 24-h urinary sodium and potassium excretion measures. Self-report was captured from two interviewer-administered 24-h dietary recalls. Twenty percent of the sample repeated the study. We examined bias in self-reported sodium and potassium from diet and the association of mismeasurement with participant characteristics. Linear regression relating self-report with objective measures was used to develop calibration equations. Self-report underestimated sodium intake by 19.8% and 20.8% and potassium intake by 1.3% and 4.6% in men and women, respectively. Sodium intake underestimation varied by Hispanic/Latino background (P<0.05) and was associated with higher body mass index (BMI). Potassium intake underestimation was associated with higher BMI, lower restaurant score (indicating lower consumption of foods prepared away from home and/or eaten outside the home) and supplement use. The R was 19.7% and 25.0% for the sodium and potassium calibration models, respectively, increasing to 59.5 and 61.7% after adjusting for within-person variability in each biomarker. These calibration equations, corrected for subject-specific reporting error, have the potential to reduce bias in diet-disease associations within this largest cohort of Hispanics in the United States.

DOI10.1038/jhh.2016.98
Alternate JournalJ Hum Hypertens
PubMed ID28205551
PubMed Central IDPMC5475267
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL095856 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001073 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0195
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
Manuscript Status: 
Published