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Is there a link between wealth and cardiovascular disease risk factors among Hispanic/Latinos? Results from the HCHS/SOL sociocultural ancillary study.

TitleIs there a link between wealth and cardiovascular disease risk factors among Hispanic/Latinos? Results from the HCHS/SOL sociocultural ancillary study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2018
AuthorsLópez-Cevallos DF, Gonzalez P, Bethel JW, Castañeda SF, Isasi CR, Penedo FJ, Ojeda L, Davis SM, Chirinos DA, Molina KM, Teng Y, Bekteshi V, Gallo LC
JournalEthn Health
Volume23
Issue8
Pagination902-913
Date Published2018 11
ISSN1465-3419
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cross-Sectional Studies, Economic Status, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Smoking, Socioeconomic Factors, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between wealth and cardiovascular disease risk factors among Hispanic/Latinos of diverse backgrounds.DESIGN: This cross-sectional study used data from 4971 Hispanic/Latinos, 18-74 years, who participated in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) baseline exam and the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Three objectively measured cardiovascular disease risk factors (hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and obesity) were included. Wealth was measured using an adapted version of the Home Affluence Scale, which included questions regarding the ownership of a home, cars, computers, and recent vacations.RESULTS: After adjusting for traditional socioeconomic indicators (income, employment, education), and other covariates, we found that wealth was not associated with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia or obesity. Analyses by sex showed that middle-wealth women were less likely to have hypercholesterolemia or obesity. Analyses by Hispanic/Latino background groups showed that while wealthier Central Americans were less likely to have obesity, wealthier Puerto Ricans were more likely to have obesity.CONCLUSION: This is the first study to explore the relationship between wealth and health among Hispanic/Latinos of diverse backgrounds, finding only partial evidence of this association. Future studies should utilize more robust measures of wealth, and address mechanisms by which wealth may impact health status among Hispanic/Latinos of diverse backgrounds in longitudinal designs.

DOI10.1080/13557858.2017.1315370
Alternate JournalEthn Health
PubMed ID28385069
PubMed Central IDPMC5796865
Grant ListN01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RC2 HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0181
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
Manuscript Status: 
Published