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Blood Pressure and Hispanic/Latino Cognitive Function: Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Results.

TitleBlood Pressure and Hispanic/Latino Cognitive Function: Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Results.
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsTarraf W, Rodriguez CJ, Daviglus ML, Lamar M, Schneiderman N, Gallo L, Talavera GA, Kaplan RC, Fornage M, Conceicao A, González HM
JournalJ Alzheimers Dis
Volume59
Issue1
Pagination31-42
Date Published2017
ISSN1875-8908
KeywordsAge Factors, Aged, Attention, blood pressure, Cognition, Cohort Studies, executive function, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Psychomotor Performance, Public Health, Residence Characteristics, Sex Factors, Sphygmomanometers, Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hispanics/Latinos are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline and dementias. High blood pressure (BP) has been implicated in both stroke and dementias. Associations between BP and cognition among diverse Latinos are still unpublished.OBJECTIVE: We examined associations between cognition and four BP based measures among diverse Hispanics/Latinos. We hypothesized that higher BP, particularly systolic pressure, and increased arterial stiffness (i.e., pulse pressure), would be associated with lower cognitive function.METHODS: We used baseline (2008-2011) Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL; n = 9,019; ages 45-74 years) data to examine cognition in relation to BP measures.RESULTS: In age, sex, and education adjusted models, systolic, pulse, and mean arterial pressure were consistently negatively associated with executive function, psychomotor speed and sustained attention, verbal episodic learning and memory, speech fluency, and mental status measures. These associations were attenuated but remained statistically significant in fully adjusted models.CONCLUSION: Among middle-aged and older diverse Hispanics/Latinos, we found modest but consistent associations between indicators of arterial stiffness, and compromised blood flow and lower cognitive function. Clinical management and public health interventions to raise awareness and enhance BP management beginning in midlife could reduce disparities and improve population health by reducing cognitive decline burdens.

DOI10.3233/JAD-170017
Alternate JournalJ Alzheimers Dis
PubMed ID28582859
PubMed Central IDPMC5567691
Grant ListP30 AG053760 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG048642 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
K01 AG040192 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0410
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Neurocognitive Reading Center
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Neurocognitive Reading Center
Manuscript Status: 
Published