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Spiritual well-being, religious activity, and the metabolic syndrome: results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

TitleSpiritual well-being, religious activity, and the metabolic syndrome: results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsBrintz CE, Birnbaum-Weitzman O, Llabre MM, Castañeda SF, Daviglus ML, Gallo LC, Giachello AL, Kim RS, Lopez L, Teng Y, Penedo FJ
JournalJ Behav Med
Volume40
Issue6
Pagination902-912
Date Published2017 Dec
ISSN1573-3521
KeywordsAdult, Aged, blood pressure, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, health status, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Linear Models, Male, Metabolic syndrome, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, United States
Abstract

Sociocultural risk and protective factors for developing the metabolic syndrome (MetS), a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), have not been well studied in Hispanics/Latinos residing in the United States (U.S.). Religiosity and/or spirituality (R/S), important aspects of Hispanic/Latino culture, have been inversely associated with CVD and multiple CVD risk factors. Cross-sectional associations between dimensions of R/S and prevalent MetS, and its five individual components were examined using multiple logistic and linear regression, among 3278 U.S., middle-aged and older Hispanic/Latino adults from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Dimensions of R/S were not associated with presence of the MetS. Certain dimensions of Spiritual Well-being (Meaning, Peace, Faith), and frequency of non-organizational religious activity were weakly but significantly associated with one or more MetS components including waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure, and systolic blood pressure. R/S variables were not associated with triglycerides, fasting glucose or HDL cholesterol levels. Prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to gain a deeper understanding of the nature of the relationship between R/S and health risk factors in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos.

DOI10.1007/s10865-017-9858-7
Alternate JournalJ Behav Med
PubMed ID28508383
PubMed Central IDPMC5681885
Grant ListN01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /
N01-HC65236 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /
N01-HC65233 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
1 RC2 HL101649 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RC2 HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /
MS#: 
0105
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published