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Spirometry Reference Equations from the HCHS/SOL (Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos).

TitleSpirometry Reference Equations from the HCHS/SOL (Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos).
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsLavange L, Davis SM, Hankinson J, Enright P, Wilson R, R Barr G, Aldrich TK, Kalhan R, Lemus H, Ni A, Smith LJ, Talavera GA
JournalAm J Respir Crit Care Med
Volume196
Issue8
Pagination993-1003
Date Published2017 10 15
ISSN1535-4970
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Central America, Emigrants and Immigrants, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Lung Diseases, Male, Mexican Americans, Mexico, Middle Aged, Reference Standards, South America, spirometry, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

RATIONALE: Accurate reference values for spirometry are important because the results are used for diagnosing common chronic lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, estimating physiologic impairment, and predicting all-cause mortality. Reference equations have been established for Mexican Americans but not for others with Hispanic/Latino backgrounds.OBJECTIVES: To develop spirometry reference equations for adult Hispanic/Latino background groups in the United States.METHODS: The HCHS/SOL (Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos) recruited a population-based probability sample of 16,415 Hispanics/Latinos aged 18-74 years living in the Bronx, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego. Participants self-identified as being of Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, or Central or South American background. Spirometry was performed using standardized methods with central quality control monitoring. Spirometric measures from a subset of 6,425 never-smoking participants without respiratory symptoms or disease were modeled as a function of sex, age, height, and Hispanic/Latino background to produce background-specific reference equations for the predicted value and lower limit of normal.MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Dominican and Puerto Rican Americans had substantially lower predicted and lower limit of normal values for FVC and FEV than those in other Hispanic/Latino background groups and also than Mexican American values from NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey).CONCLUSIONS: For patients of Dominican and Puerto Rican background who present with pulmonary symptoms in clinical practice, use of background-specific spirometry reference equations may provide more appropriate predicted and lower limit of normal values, enabling more accurate diagnoses of abnormality and physiologic impairment.

DOI10.1164/rccm.201610-1987OC
Alternate JournalAm J Respir Crit Care Med
PubMed ID28613924
PubMed Central IDPMC5649980
Grant ListR01 HL077612 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001422 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0046
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published