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Anxious Depression and Neurocognition among Middle-Aged and Older Hispanic/Latino Adults: Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Results.

TitleAnxious Depression and Neurocognition among Middle-Aged and Older Hispanic/Latino Adults: Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Results.
Publication TypePublication
Year2018
AuthorsCamacho A, Tarraf W, Jimenez DE, Gallo LC, Gonzalez P, Kaplan RC, Lamar M, Khambaty T, Thyagarajan B, Perreira KM, Hernandez R, Cai J, Daviglus ML, Wassertheil-Smoller S, González HM
JournalAm J Geriatr Psychiatry
Volume26
Issue2
Pagination238-249
Date Published2018 02
ISSN1545-7214
KeywordsAged, Anxiety Disorders, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cognitive Dysfunction, Cohort Studies, Comoros, Depressive Disorder, Female, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Severity of Illness Index, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to examine the association between verbal learning, fluency, and processing speed with anxious depression symptomatology (ADS) among diverse Hispanics. We hypothesized an inverse association of anxious depression with neurocognition among Hispanics of different heritage.DESIGN: Data are from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. The sample included 9,311participants aged 45-74 years (mean: 56.5 years). A latent class analysis of items from the Center for Epidemiological Studies for Depression scale and the Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to derive an anxious depression construct. Neurocognitive measures included scores on the Brief Spanish English Verbal Learning Test (B-SEVLT, learning and recall trials), Word Fluency (WF), Digit Symbol Substitution (DSS) test, and a Global Cognitive Score (GCS). We fit survey linear regression models to test the associations between anxious depression symptomatology and cognitive function. We tested for effect modification by sex, Hispanic heritage, and age groups.RESULTS: Among men, 71.6% reported low, 23.3% moderate, and 5.1% high ADS. Among women, 55.1% reported low, 33.2% moderate, and 11.8% high ADS. After controlling for age, sex, sociodemographic characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors and disease, and antidepressant use, we found significant inverse associations between moderate and high anxious depression (ref:low) with B-SEVLT learning and recall, DSS and GCS. Moderate, but not high, anxious depression was inversely associated with WF. Associations were not modified by sex, Hispanic heritage, or age.CONCLUSIONS: Increased anxious depression symptomatology is associated with decreased neurocognitive function among Hispanics. Longitudinal studies are needed to establish temporality and infer if negative emotional symptoms precede cognitive deficits.

DOI10.1016/j.jagp.2017.06.002
Alternate JournalAm J Geriatr Psychiatry
PubMed ID28684241
PubMed Central IDPMC5752627
Grant ListK01 HL130712 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG048642 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
K01 AG040192 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL136266 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0101
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
Manuscript Status: 
Published