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Association Between Sleep Timing, Obesity, Diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Cohort Study.

TitleAssociation Between Sleep Timing, Obesity, Diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Cohort Study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsKnutson KL, Wu D, Patel SR, Loredo JS, Redline S, Cai J, Gallo LC, Mossavar-Rahmani Y, Ramos AR, Teng Y, Daviglus ML, Zee PC
JournalSleep
Volume40
Issue4
Date Published2017 04 01
ISSN1550-9109
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Blood Glucose, Body mass index, Circadian Rhythm, Cohort Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Fasting, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, insulin resistance, Linear Models, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Self Report, sleep, Time Factors, Young Adult
Abstract

Study Objectives: Recent studies implicate inadequate sleep duration and quality in metabolic disease. Fewer studies have examined the timing of sleep, which may be important because of its potential impact on circadian rhythms of metabolic function. We examined the association between sleep timing and metabolic risk among Hispanic/Latino adults.Methods: Cross-sectional data from community-based study of 13429 participants aged 18-74 years. People taking diabetic medications were excluded. Sleep timing was determined from self-reported bedtimes and wake times. Chronotype was defined as the midpoint of sleep on weekends adjusted for sleep duration on weekdays. Other measurements included body mass index (BMI), fasting glucose levels, estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glucose levels 2 hours post oral glucose ingestion, and hemoglobin A1c. Survey linear regression models tested associations between sleep timing and metabolic measures. Analyses were stratified by diabetes status and age-group when significant interactions were observed.Results: Among participants with diabetes, fasting glucose levels were positively associated with bedtime (approximately +3%/hour later, p < .01) and midpoint of sleep (approximately +2%/hour later, p < .05). In participants with and without diabetes combined, HOMA-IR was positively associated with midpoint of sleep (+1.5%/hr later, p < .05), and chronotype (+1.2%/hour later, p < .05). Associations differed by age-group. Among those < 36 years, later sleep timing was associated with lower BMI, lower fasting glucose, and lower HbA1c, but the opposite association was observed among older participants.Conclusions: Later sleep timing was associated with higher estimated insulin resistance across all groups. Some associations between sleep timing and metabolic measures may be age-dependent.

DOI10.1093/sleep/zsx014
Alternate JournalSleep
PubMed ID28329091
PubMed Central IDPMC6410944
Grant ListR01 DK095207 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
KL2 TR000461 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
L60 MD005231 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0034
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published