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Commuting and Sleep: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sueño Ancillary Study.

TitleCommuting and Sleep: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sueño Ancillary Study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2018
AuthorsPetrov ME, Weng J, Reid KJ, Wang R, Ramos AR, Wallace DM, Alcantara C, Cai J, Perreira K, Giacinto RAEspinoza, Zee PC, Sotres-Alvarez D, Patel SR
JournalAm J Prev Med
Volume54
Issue3
Paginatione49-e57
Date Published2018 03
ISSN1873-2607
Keywordsactigraphy, Adult, employment, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Income, Male, Middle Aged, Self Report, sleep, Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders, Time Factors, Transportation, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Commute time is associated with reduced sleep time, but previous studies have relied on self-reported sleep assessment. The present study investigated the relationships between commute time for employment and objective sleep patterns among non-shift working U.S. Hispanic/Latino adults.METHODS: From 2010 to 2013, Hispanic/Latino employed, non-shift-working adults (n=760, aged 18-64 years) from the Sueño study, ancillary to the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, reported their total daily commute time to and from work, completed questionnaires on sleep and other health behaviors, and wore wrist actigraphs to record sleep duration, continuity, and variability for 1 week. Survey linear regression models of the actigraphic and self-reported sleep measures regressed on categorized commute time (short: 1-44 minutes; moderate: 45-89 minutes; long: ≥90 minutes) were built adjusting for relevant covariates. For associations that suggested a linear relationship, continuous commute time was modeled as the exposure. Moderation effects by age, sex, income, and depressive symptoms also were explored.RESULTS: Commute time was linearly related to sleep duration on work days such that each additional hour of commute time conferred 15 minutes of sleep loss (p=0.01). Compared with short commutes, individuals with moderate commutes had greater sleep duration variability (p=0.04) and lower interdaily stability (p=0.046, a measure of sleep/wake schedule regularity). No significant associations were detected for self-reported sleep measures.CONCLUSIONS: Commute time is significantly associated with actigraphy-measured sleep duration and regularity among Hispanic/Latino adults. Interventions to shorten commute times should be evaluated to help improve sleep habits in this minority population.

DOI10.1016/j.amepre.2017.11.006
Alternate JournalAm J Prev Med
PubMed ID29338957
PubMed Central IDPMC5818327
Grant ListK24 HL127307 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K23 HL125748 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
KL2 TR000461 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P20 MD002316 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL098297 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0355
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Affiliated Investigator - Not at HCHS/SOL site
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published