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Perceptions of Cancer Risk/Efficacy and Cancer-Related Risk Behaviors: Results From the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

TitlePerceptions of Cancer Risk/Efficacy and Cancer-Related Risk Behaviors: Results From the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2018
AuthorsFox RS, Mills SD, Roesch SC, Sotres-Alvarez D, Gonzalez P, Bekteshi V, Cai J, Lounsbury DW, Talavera GA, Penedo FJ, Malcarne VL
JournalHealth Educ Behav
Volume45
Issue5
Pagination790-799
Date Published2018 10
ISSN1552-6127
KeywordsAdult, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Male, Neoplasms, Perception, Prospective Studies, Risk-Taking, United States
Abstract

This study evaluated the associations among perceived risk, perceived efficacy, and engagement in six cancer-related risk behaviors in a population-based Hispanic/Latino sample. Interviews were conducted with 5,313 Hispanic/Latino adults as part of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Participants were recruited from the study's four field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) between February 2010 and June 2011. Perceived risk and perceived efficacy were assessed with questions drawn from the Health Interview National Trends Survey. More than half of the sample endorsed perceived risk of cancer associated with the six evaluated behaviors, as well as general perceived efficacy for preventing cancer. Adjusted logistic regression analyses demonstrated significant differences across Hispanic/Latino background groups for perceived risk associated with high consumption of alcohol and saturated fat, low consumption of fruits and vegetables, and insufficient exercise but not with smoking or low consumption of fiber. Differences were also found for the belief, "It seems like everything causes cancer" but not for other perceived efficacy items. Perceived cancer risk and perceived efficacy for preventing cancer were neither independently nor interactively associated with engagement in cancer-related risk behaviors after controlling for sociodemographic covariates. Results suggest that perceptions of risk and efficacy with regard to cancer vary across Hispanic/Latino background groups, and therefore background group differences should be considered in prevention efforts. Perceived risk and perceived efficacy were not related to cancer-related risk behaviors among Hispanics/Latinos. Further work is needed to evaluate determinants of cancer-related risk in this population.

DOI10.1177/1090198117744242
Alternate JournalHealth Educ Behav
PubMed ID29284295
PubMed Central IDPMC6035116
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 CA193193 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0190
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published