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Occupational Exposures and Metabolic Syndrome Among Hispanics/Latinos: Cross-Sectional Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

TitleOccupational Exposures and Metabolic Syndrome Among Hispanics/Latinos: Cross-Sectional Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsBulka CM, Daviglus ML, Persky VW, Durazo-Arvizu RA, M Avilés-Santa L, Gallo LC, H Hosgood D, Singer RH, Talavera GA, Thyagarajan B, Zeng D, Argos M
JournalJ Occup Environ Med
Volume59
Issue11
Pagination1047-1055
Date Published2017 11
ISSN1536-5948
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Cross-Sectional Studies, Dyslipidemias, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Hypertension, Lipoproteins, LDL, Male, Metabolic syndrome, Metals, Middle Aged, Obesity, Abdominal, Occupational Exposure, Pesticides, Prevalence, Self Report, Solvents, triglycerides, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We assessed the cross-sectional relationships of self-reported current occupational exposures to solvents, metals, and pesticides with metabolic syndrome and its components among 7127 participants in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.METHODS: Metabolic syndrome was defined as a clustering of abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high blood pressure, and/or high fasting glucose. Regression models that incorporated inverse probability of exposure weighting were used to estimate prevalence ratios.RESULTS: Solvent exposure was associated with a 32% higher prevalence of high blood pressure (95% confidence interval: 1.09 to 1.60) than participants not reporting exposure. No associations were observed for occupational exposures with abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein, or metabolic syndrome.CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that solvent exposure may be an important occupational risk factor for high blood pressure among Hispanics/Latinos in the United States.

DOI10.1097/JOM.0000000000001115
Alternate JournalJ Occup Environ Med
PubMed ID29112602
PubMed Central IDPMC5841242
Grant ListT42 OH008672 / OH / NIOSH CDC HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL125294 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300003C / HG / NHGRI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0475
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published