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Genome-Wide Association Study of Blood Pressure Traits by Hispanic/Latino Background: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleGenome-Wide Association Study of Blood Pressure Traits by Hispanic/Latino Background: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsSofer T, Wong Q, Hartwig FP, Taylor K, Warren HR, Evangelou E, Cabrera CP, Levy D, Kramer H, Lange LA, Horta BL, Kerr KF, Reiner AP, Franceschini N
Corporate AuthorsCOGENT-BP consortium
JournalSci Rep
Volume7
Issue1
Pagination10348
Date Published2017 09 04
ISSN2045-2322
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Alleles, blood pressure, Chromosome Mapping, Female, genome-wide association study, Genotype, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Public Health Surveillance, Quantitative Trait, Heritable, Reproducibility of Results, United States
Abstract

Hypertension prevalence varies between ethnic groups, possibly due to differences in genetic, environmental, and cultural determinants. Hispanic/Latino Americans are a diverse and understudied population. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of blood pressure (BP) traits in 12,278 participants from the Hispanics Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). In the discovery phase we identified eight previously unreported BP loci. In the replication stage, we tested these loci in the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study of admixed Southern Brazilians, the COGENT-BP study of African descent, women of European descent from the Women Health Initiative (WHI), and a sample of European descent from the UK Biobank. No loci met the Bonferroni-adjusted level of statistical significance (0.0024). Two loci had marginal evidence of replication: rs78701042 (NGF) with diastolic BP (P = 0.008 in the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study), and rs7315692 (SLC5A8) with systolic BP (P = 0.007 in European ancestry replication). We investigated whether previously reported loci associated with BP in studies of European, African, and Asian ancestry generalize to Hispanics/Latinos. Overall, 26% of the known associations in studies of individuals of European and Chinese ancestries generalized, while only a single association previously discovered in a people of African descent generalized.

DOI10.1038/s41598-017-09019-1
Alternate JournalSci Rep
PubMed ID28871152
PubMed Central IDPMC5583292
Grant ListHHSN268201300005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 ES010126 / ES / NIEHS NIH HHS / United States
U01 AG009740 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
MC_QA137853 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL105756 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK063491 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R21 HL123677 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 MD012765 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001881 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0333
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Genetic Analysis Center - University of Washington, Seattle
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
Manuscript Status: 
Published