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The association of cardiorespiratory fitness with cardiometabolic factors, markers of inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction in Latino youth: findings from the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth.

TitleThe association of cardiorespiratory fitness with cardiometabolic factors, markers of inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction in Latino youth: findings from the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth.
Publication TypePublication
Year2018
AuthorsIsasi CR, Strizich GM, Kaplan R, Daviglus ML, Sotres-Alvarez D, Vidot DC, Llabre MM, Talavera G, Carnethon MR
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume28
Issue9
Pagination583-589.e3
Date Published2018 09
ISSN1873-2585
KeywordsAdolescent, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Cardiovascular Diseases, Child, Child Health, exercise, Female, Health Surveys, heart rate, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Metabolic Diseases, Obesity, Physical Fitness, United States
Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate the relationship of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) with cardiovascular disease risk factors and a biomarker of endothelial dysfunction (e-selectin) among Hispanic/Latino youth.METHODS: The study included 1380 Hispanic/Latino youths (8-16 years old) from the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth that enrolled from four cities (Bronx, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego). CRF was assessed by a 3-minute step test that uses postexercise heart rate to estimate maximal oxygen uptake. Regression models assessed differences in cardiometabolic markers across quartiles of CRF, adjusting for potential confounders.RESULTS: CRF was higher among boys (mean: 57.6 mL per kg/min, 95% confidence interval, 56.8-58.4) compared to girls (mean: 54.7 mL per kg/min, 95% confidence interval, 53.9-55.5). Higher levels of CRF were associated with more favorable levels of cardiometabolic, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction factors (P-values <.001) and independently of physical activity and sedentary time. Compared to the lowest quartile of CRF, the odds of having greater than or equal to two cardiovascular disease risk factors was lower at higher quartiles of CRF, after adjustment for potential confounders.CONCLUSIONS: Among Hispanic/Latino youth, CRF appears to be a strong protective factor for endothelial dysfunction and cardiometabolic risk factors. Strategies to improve CRF may be a useful approach for improving cardiovascular health in youth.

DOI10.1016/j.annepidem.2018.02.007
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID29548689
PubMed Central IDPMC6093801
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001073 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK092949 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL136266 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL102130 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0515
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
Manuscript Status: 
Published