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Metabolic Syndrome and Neurocognition Among Diverse Middle-Aged and Older Hispanics/Latinos: HCHS/SOL Results.

TitleMetabolic Syndrome and Neurocognition Among Diverse Middle-Aged and Older Hispanics/Latinos: HCHS/SOL Results.
Publication TypePublication
Year2018
AuthorsGonzález HM, Tarraf W, Vásquez P, Sanderlin AH, Rosenberg NI, Davis S, Rodriguez CJ, Gallo LC, Thyagarajan B, Daviglus M, Khambaty T, Cai J, Schneiderman N
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume41
Issue7
Pagination1501-1509
Date Published2018 07
ISSN1935-5548
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, aging, Cognition, Cognition Disorders, Cross-Sectional Studies, ethnic groups, executive function, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Metabolic syndrome, Middle Aged, Young Adult
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Hispanics/Latinos have the highest risks for metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the U.S. and are also at increased risk for Alzheimer disease. In this study, we examined associations among neurocognitive function, MetS, and inflammation among diverse middle-aged and older Hispanics/Latinos.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Cross-sectional data (2008-2011) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) were analyzed to examine associations between neurocognition and MetS among diverse Hispanics/Latinos ( = 9,136; aged 45-74 years).RESULTS: MetS status was associated with lower global neurocognition, mental status, verbal learning and memory, verbal fluency, and executive function. Age significantly modified the associations between MetS and learning and memory measures. Significant associations between MetS and neurocognition were observed among middle-aged Hispanics/Latinos, and all associations remained robust to additional covariates adjustment.CONCLUSIONS: We found that MetS was associated with lower neurocognitive function, particularly in midlife. Our findings support and extend current hypotheses that midlife may be a particularly vulnerable developmental period for unhealthy neurocognitive aging.

DOI10.2337/dc17-1896
Alternate JournalDiabetes Care
PubMed ID29716895
PubMed Central IDPMC6014545
Grant ListP30 AG053760 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
P50 AG005131 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG048642 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RF1 AG054548 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0625
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Neurocognitive Reading Center
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Neurocognitive Reading Center
Manuscript Status: 
Published