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Stress and Resilience: Key Correlates of Mental Health and Substance Use in the Hispanic Community Health Study of Latino Youth.

TitleStress and Resilience: Key Correlates of Mental Health and Substance Use in the Hispanic Community Health Study of Latino Youth.
Publication TypePublication
Year2019
AuthorsPerreira KM, Marchante AN, Schwartz SJ, Isasi CR, Carnethon MR, Corliss HL, Kaplan RC, Santisteban DA, Vidot DC, Van Horn L, Delamater AM
JournalJ Immigr Minor Health
Volume21
Issue1
Pagination4-13
Date Published2019 Feb
ISSN1557-1920
KeywordsAcculturation, Adolescent, Alcoholism, Anxiety, Child, cigarette smoking, Cohort Studies, Cultural Characteristics, Depression, Emigrants and Immigrants, Family Relations, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, mental health, Public Health, Resilience, Psychological, Sex Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, Stress, Psychological, Substance-Related Disorders, United States
Abstract

This study examined associations of immigrant generation, acculturation, and sources of stress and resilience with four outcomes-depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, alcohol susceptibility, and smoking susceptibility. We used data from 1466 youth (ages 8-16) enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study of Latino Youth (SOL Youth), a probability sample of Hispanic/Latino youth living in Chicago (IL), Miami (FL), Bronx (NY), and San Diego (CA). We found no evidence of an immigrant paradox. Greater children's acculturative stress was associated with depression/anxiety symptoms; greater parent's acculturative stress was associated with smoking susceptibility. Family functioning and children's ethnic identity were associated with fewer depression/anxiety symptoms and lower alcohol/smoking susceptibility. Although acculturation-related stressors increase youths' risks for poor mental health and substance use, the development of positive ethnic identities and close, well-functioning family support systems can help protect Latino/Hispanic children from the negative behavioral and health-related consequences of stress.

DOI10.1007/s10903-018-0724-7
Alternate JournalJ Immigr Minor Health
PubMed ID29550906
PubMed Central IDPMC6141349
Grant ListN01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01HL102130 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD50924 / / National Institute of Child Health and Human Development /
N01-HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK092949 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL102130 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0356
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
Manuscript Status: 
Published