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Impact of shift work schedules on actigraphy-based measures of sleep in Hispanic workers: results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos ancillary Sueño study.

TitleImpact of shift work schedules on actigraphy-based measures of sleep in Hispanic workers: results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos ancillary Sueño study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2018
AuthorsReid KJ, Weng J, Ramos AR, Zee PC, Daviglus M, Mossavar-Rahmani Y, Sotres-Alvarez D, Gallo LC, Chirinos DA, Patel SR
JournalSleep
Volume41
Issue10
Date Published2018 10 01
ISSN1550-9109
Keywordsactigraphy, Adult, Depression, employment, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Personnel Staffing and Scheduling, Public Health, Shift Work Schedule, sleep, Surveys and Questionnaires, Time Factors, Wakefulness, Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract

Study Objectives: To describe sleep characteristics of shift workers compared with day workers from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sueño ancillary study and test the hypothesis that shift work is associated with shorter sleep duration, worse sleep quality, greater sleep variability, and other sleep/health-related factors.Methods: Employed adults (N = 1253, mean age 46.3 years, 36.3% male) from the Sueño study were included. Measures of sleep duration, timing, regularity, and continuity were calculated from 7 days of wrist-activity monitoring. Participants provided information on demographics, employment, work schedule (day, afternoon, night, split, irregular, and rotating), sleepiness, depressive symptoms, medications, caffeine, and alcohol use. Survey linear regression adjusting for age, sex, background, site, number of jobs, and work hours was used.Results: In age and sex-adjusted models, all shift work schedules were associated with delayed sleep timing. Night and irregular schedules were associated with shorter sleep duration, greater napping, and greater variability of sleep. Afternoon and rotating shifts were associated with lower sleep regularity. In fully adjusted models, night and irregular schedules remained associated with shorter sleep duration, later sleep midpoint, and greater variability in sleep measures compared with day schedules. Split schedules were associated with, less time in bed, less sleep fragmentation, and less wake during the sleep period than day schedules.Conclusions: Work schedule significantly affects sleep-wake with substantial differences between day work and other types of schedule. Detailed assessment of work schedule type not just night shift should be considered as an important covariate when examining the association between sleep and health outcomes.

DOI10.1093/sleep/zsy131
Alternate JournalSleep
PubMed ID30010969
PubMed Central IDPMC6187107
Grant ListK24 HL127307 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / NHLBI NIH HHS / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute / United States
N01HC65233 / NHLBI NIH HHS / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute / United States
N01HC65235 / NHLBI NIH HHS / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute / United States
N01HC65234 / NHLBI NIH HHS / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute / United States
L60 MD005231 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / NHLBI NIH HHS / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute / United States
R21 AG056952 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL098297 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0278
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Manuscript Status: 
Published