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Weekly sleep trajectories and their associations with obesity and hypertension in the Hispanic/Latino population.

TitleWeekly sleep trajectories and their associations with obesity and hypertension in the Hispanic/Latino population.
Publication TypePublication
Year2018
AuthorsChen J, Patel SR, Redline S, Durazo-Arvizu R, Garside DB, Reid KJ, Lash J, Sotres-Alvarez D, Gallo LC, Petrov ME, Perreira KM, Talavera GA, Ramos AR, Zee P, Daviglus ML
JournalSleep
Volume41
Issue10
Date Published2018 10 01
ISSN1550-9109
Keywordsactigraphy, Adolescent, Adult, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Odds Ratio, sleep, Young Adult
Abstract

Study Objectives: To identify weekly sleep trajectories (sleep pattern changing by day over a course of week) of specific characteristics and examine the associations between trajectory classes and obesity and hypertension.Methods: A total of 2043 participants (mean age 46.9, 65.5% female) completed at least 7 days of actigraphy aged 18-64 from the Sueño ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Weekly sleep trajectories for three daily level measures (wake after sleep onset [WASO], daytime napping duration, and intranight instability index) were identified using latent class growth models. The outcomes were obesity and hypertension.Results: Using the trajectory with low-stable WASO as reference, the trajectory classes with increasing and high-concave patterns had significantly higher odds for obesity (OR 3.64 [1.23-10.84]) and hypertension (OR 5.25 [1.33, 20.82]), respectively. Compared with individuals with a low-stable napping duration trajectory, those with the high-concave pattern class were associated with hypertension (OR 2.27 [1.10-4.67]), and the association was mediated in part by obesity (OR 1.11 [1.00-1.22]). Individuals in the high intranight instability index trajectory had significantly larger likelihood for both obesity (OR 1.90 [1.26-2.86]) and hypertension (OR 1.86 [1.13-3.06]) compared with those in the low intranight instability index trajectory.Conclusions: Weekly trajectories varied for WASO, daytime napping duration, and intranight instability index. The trajectories with relatively larger values for these three measures were associated with greater risk for obesity and hypertension. These findings suggest that a stable pattern with relatively small weekly and nightly variability may be beneficial for cardiovascular health.

DOI10.1093/sleep/zsy150
Alternate JournalSleep
PubMed ID30053253
PubMed Central IDPMC6187108
Grant ListK24 HL127307 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / NHLBI NIH HHS / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / NHLBI NIH HHS / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute / United States
N01HC65235 / NHLBI NIH HHS / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute / United States
N01HC65234 / NHLBI NIH HHS / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute / United States
N01HC65237 / NHLBI NIH HHS / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL098297 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0500
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Manuscript Status: 
Published