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Sleep Timing, Stability, and BP in the Sueño Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleSleep Timing, Stability, and BP in the Sueño Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2019
AuthorsAbbott SM, Weng J, Reid KJ, Daviglus ML, Gallo LC, Loredo JS, Nyenhuis SM, Ramos AR, Shah NA, Sotres-Alvarez D, Patel SR, Zee PC
JournalChest
Volume155
Issue1
Pagination60-68
Date Published2019 01
ISSN1931-3543
Keywordsactigraphy, Adolescent, Adult, blood pressure, Circadian Rhythm, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hispanic or Latino, Humans, Incidence, Information Systems, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Public Health, Retrospective Studies, Self Report, sleep, Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders, Time Factors, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Timing and stability of the sleep-wake cycle are potential modifiable risk factors for cardiometabolic disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between objective measures of sleep-wake timing and stability with cardiometabolic disease risk.METHODS: In this multicenter, cross-sectional, population-based study, actigraphy data were obtained from the 2,156 adults, aged 18 to 64 years, recruited from the Sueño ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (2010-2013). These data were correlated with measures of cardiometabolic disease risk, including systolic and diastolic BPs, homeostatic assessment of insulin resistance, glycosylated hemoglobin, BMI, and hypertension and diabetes status.RESULTS: Each 10% decrease in interdaily stability was associated with a 3.0% absolute increase in the prevalence of hypertension (95% CI, 0.6-5.3; P < .05), an increase in systolic BP by 0.78 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.12-1.45; P < .05) and an increase in diastolic BP by 0.80 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.28-1.32; P < .05). In addition, delaying the midpoint of sleep by 1 h was associated with an increase in systolic BP by 0.73 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.30-1.16; P < .01) and diastolic BP by 0.53 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.17-0.90; P < .01). These associations were not significant after adjusting for shift work status. No association was found between interdaily stability or sleep timing and diabetes, BMI, or insulin resistance.CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that beyond sleep duration, the timing and regularity of sleep-wake schedules are related to hypertension prevalence and BP.

DOI10.1016/j.chest.2018.09.018
Alternate JournalChest
PubMed ID30300651
PubMed Central IDPMC6344384
Grant ListK24 HL127307 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R21 HL140437 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL140580 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R21 AG056952 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P01 AG011412 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL098297 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0280
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Manuscript Status: 
Published