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Sleep Timing, Stability, and BP in the Sueño Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleSleep Timing, Stability, and BP in the Sueño Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2019
AuthorsAbbott SM, Weng J, Reid KJ, Daviglus ML, Gallo LC, Loredo JS, Nyenhuis SM, Ramos AR, Shah NA, Sotres-Alvarez D, Patel SR, Zee PC
JournalChest
Volume155
Issue1
Pagination60-68
Date Published2019 01
ISSN1931-3543
Keywordsactigraphy, Adolescent, Adult, blood pressure, Circadian Rhythm, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Incidence, Information Systems, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Public Health, Retrospective Studies, Self Report, sleep, Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders, Time Factors, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Timing and stability of the sleep-wake cycle are potential modifiable risk factors for cardiometabolic disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between objective measures of sleep-wake timing and stability with cardiometabolic disease risk.METHODS: In this multicenter, cross-sectional, population-based study, actigraphy data were obtained from the 2,156 adults, aged 18 to 64 years, recruited from the Sueño ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (2010-2013). These data were correlated with measures of cardiometabolic disease risk, including systolic and diastolic BPs, homeostatic assessment of insulin resistance, glycosylated hemoglobin, BMI, and hypertension and diabetes status.RESULTS: Each 10% decrease in interdaily stability was associated with a 3.0% absolute increase in the prevalence of hypertension (95% CI, 0.6-5.3; P < .05), an increase in systolic BP by 0.78 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.12-1.45; P < .05) and an increase in diastolic BP by 0.80 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.28-1.32; P < .05). In addition, delaying the midpoint of sleep by 1 h was associated with an increase in systolic BP by 0.73 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.30-1.16; P < .01) and diastolic BP by 0.53 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.17-0.90; P < .01). These associations were not significant after adjusting for shift work status. No association was found between interdaily stability or sleep timing and diabetes, BMI, or insulin resistance.CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that beyond sleep duration, the timing and regularity of sleep-wake schedules are related to hypertension prevalence and BP.

DOI10.1016/j.chest.2018.09.018
Alternate JournalChest
PubMed ID30300651
PubMed Central IDPMC6344384
Grant ListK24 HL127307 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R21 HL140437 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL140580 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R21 AG056952 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P01 AG011412 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL098297 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0280
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Manuscript Status: 
Published