Accessibility issues or difficulties with this website?
Call 919-962-2073 or email hchsadministration@unc.edu.

Relationship between area mortgage foreclosures, homeownership, and cardiovascular disease risk factors: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleRelationship between area mortgage foreclosures, homeownership, and cardiovascular disease risk factors: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2019
AuthorsChambers EC, Hanna DB, Hua S, Duncan DT, Camacho-Rivera M, Zenk SN, McCurley JL, Perreira K, Gellman MD, Gallo LC
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume19
Issue1
Pagination77
Date Published2019 Jan 17
ISSN1471-2458
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Bankruptcy, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cities, Female, Hispanic Americans, housing, Humans, Hypercholesterolemia, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Ownership, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Smoking, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The risk of mortgage foreclosure disproportionately burdens Hispanic/Latino populations perpetuating racial disparities in health. In this study, we examined the relationship between area-level mortgage foreclosure risk, homeownership, and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors among participants of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).METHODS: HCHS/SOL participants were age 18-74 years when recruited from four U.S. metropolitan areas. Mortgage foreclosure risk was obtained from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Homeownership, sociodemographic factors, and cardiovascular disease risk factors were measured at baseline interview between 2008 and 2011. There were 13,856 individuals contributing to the analysis (median age 39 years old, 53% female).RESULTS: Renters in high foreclosure risk areas had a higher prevalence of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia but no association with smoking status compared to renters in low foreclosure risk areas. Renters were more likely to smoke cigarettes than homeowners.CONCLUSION: Among US Hispanic/Latinos in urban cities, area foreclosure and homeownership have implications for risk of cardiovascular disease.

DOI10.1186/s12889-019-6412-2
Alternate JournalBMC Public Health
PubMed ID30654781
PubMed Central IDPMC6335763
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R03HL140265 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K01HL125466 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K01HL137557 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
K01 HL137557 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K01 HL125466 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R03 HL140265 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0409
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published