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Employment status and the association of sociocultural stress with sleep in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

TitleEmployment status and the association of sociocultural stress with sleep in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).
Publication TypePublication
Year2019
AuthorsAlcantara C, Gallo LC, Wen J, Dudley KA, Wallace DM, Mossavar-Rahmani Y, Sotres-Alvarez D, Zee PC, Ramos AR, Petrov ME, Casement MD, Hall MH, Redline S, Patel SR
JournalSleep
Volume42
Issue4
Date Published2019 04 01
ISSN1550-9109
KeywordsAcculturation, actigraphy, Adult, Cross-Sectional Studies, employment, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Public Health, racism, Risk Factors, sleep, Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders, Stress, Psychological, Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES: We examined the association of sociocultural stress severity (i.e. acculturation stress, ethnic discrimination) and chronic stress burden with multiple dimensions of sleep in a population-based sample of US Hispanics/Latinos. We also explored whether employment status modified stress-sleep associations.METHODS: We conducted survey linear regressions to test the cross-sectional association of sociocultural stress severity and stress burden with sleep dimensions using data collected between 2010 and 2013 from individuals who participated in both the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sueño and Sociocultural Ancillary studies (N = 1192).RESULTS: Greater acculturation stress (B = 0.75, standard error [SE] = 0.26, p < .01) and chronic psychosocial stress burden (B = 1.04, SE = 0.18, p < .001) were associated with greater insomnia symptoms but were not associated with actigraphic measures of sleep. Ethnic discrimination was not associated with any of the sleep dimensions. The association of acculturation stress with insomnia severity was greater in unemployed (B = 2.06, SE = 0.34) compared to employed (B = 1.01, SE = 0.31) participants (p-interaction = .08).CONCLUSIONS: Acculturation stress severity and chronic stress burden are important and consistent correlates of insomnia, but not actigraphically measured sleep dimensions. If replicated, future research should test whether interventions targeting the resolution of sociocultural stress improve sleep quality in Hispanics/Latinos.

DOI10.1093/sleep/zsz002
Alternate JournalSleep
PubMed ID30649533
PubMed Central IDPMC6448284
Grant ListK01 MH103511 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
RC2 HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL098297 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K24 HL127307 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K23 HL125748 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0423
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published