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Socioeconomic Adversity, Social Resources, and Allostatic Load Among Hispanic/Latino Youth: The Study of Latino Youth.

TitleSocioeconomic Adversity, Social Resources, and Allostatic Load Among Hispanic/Latino Youth: The Study of Latino Youth.
Publication TypePublication
Year2019
AuthorsGallo LC, Roesch SC, Bravin JI, Savin KL, Perreira KM, Carnethon MR, Delamater AM, Salazar CR, Lopez-Gurrola M, Isasi CR
JournalPsychosom Med
Volume81
Issue3
Pagination305-312
Date Published2019 04
ISSN1534-7796
KeywordsAdolescent, Adverse Childhood Experiences, Allostasis, Child, Cohort Studies, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Social Capital, Socioeconomic Factors, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We examined associations among socioeconomic adversity, social resources, and allostatic load in Hispanic/Latino youth, who are at high risk for obesity and related cardiometabolic risks.METHODS: Participants were 1343 Hispanic/Latino youth (51% male; ages 8-16 years) offspring of Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos participants. Between 2012 and 2014, youth underwent a fasting blood draw and anthropometric assessment, and youth and their enrolled caregivers provided social and demographic information. A composite indicator of allostatic load represented dysregulation across general metabolism, cardiovascular, glucose metabolism, lipid, and inflammation/hemostatic systems. Socioeconomic adversity was a composite of caregiver education, employment status, economic hardship, family income relative to poverty, family structure, and receipt of food assistance. Social resources were a composite of family functioning, parental closeness, peer support, and parenting style variables.RESULTS: Multivariable regression models that adjusted for sociodemographic factors, design effects (strata and clustering), and sample weights revealed a significant, positive, association between socioeconomic adversity and allostatic load (β = .10, p = .035), and a significant, inverse association between socioeconomic adversity and social resources (β = -.10, p = .013). Social resources did not relate to allostatic load and did not moderate or help explain the association of adversity with allostatic load (all p values > .05).CONCLUSIONS: Statistically significant, but small associations of socioeconomic adversity with both allostatic load and social resources were identified. The small effects may partially reflect range restriction given overall high socioeconomic adversity and high social resources in the cohort.

DOI10.1097/PSY.0000000000000668
Alternate JournalPsychosom Med
PubMed ID30633066
PubMed Central IDPMC6443433
Grant ListHHSN268201300005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300004C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300001C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001114 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R18 DK104250 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300003C / HG / NHGRI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK092949 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL102130 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0425
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published