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Association of food parenting practice patterns with obesogenic dietary intake in Hispanic/Latino youth: Results from the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth (SOL Youth).

TitleAssociation of food parenting practice patterns with obesogenic dietary intake in Hispanic/Latino youth: Results from the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth (SOL Youth).
Publication TypePublication
Year2019
AuthorsLeCroy MN, Siega-Riz AMaria, Albrecht SS, Ward DS, Cai J, Perreira KM, Isasi CR, Mossavar-Rahmani Y, Gallo LC, Castañeda SF, Stevens J
JournalAppetite
Volume140
Pagination277-287
Date Published2019 09 01
ISSN1095-8304
KeywordsAdolescent, Child, Cluster Analysis, diet, Diet Surveys, Dietary Sugars, Eating, Feeding Behavior, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Obesity, Parenting, Snacks, Sugar-Sweetened Beverages
Abstract

Some food parenting practices (FPPs) are associated with obesogenic dietary intake in non-Hispanic youth, but studies in Hispanics/Latinos are limited. We examined how FPPs relate to obesogenic dietary intake using cross-sectional data from 1214 Hispanic/Latino 8-16-year-olds and their parents/caregivers in the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth (SOL Youth). Diet was assessed with 2 24-h dietary recalls. Obesogenic items were snack foods, sweets, and high-sugar beverages. Three FPPs (Rules and Limits, Monitoring, and Pressure to Eat) derived from the Parenting strategies for Eating and Activity Scale (PEAS) were assessed. K-means cluster analysis identified 5 groups of parents with similar FPP scores. Survey-weighted multiple logistic regression examined associations of cluster membership with diet. Parents in the controlling (high scores for all FPPs) vs. indulgent (low scores for all FPPs) cluster had a 1.75 (95% CI: 1.02, 3.03) times higher odds of having children with high obesogenic dietary intake. Among parents of 12-16-year-olds, membership in the pressuring (high Pressure to Eat, low Rules and Limits and Monitoring scores) vs. indulgent cluster was associated with a 2.96 (95% CI: 1.51, 5.80) times greater odds of high obesogenic dietary intake. All other associations were null. Future longitudinal examinations of FPPs are needed to determine temporal associations with obesogenic dietary intake in Hispanic/Latino youth.

DOI10.1016/j.appet.2019.05.006
Alternate JournalAppetite
PubMed ID31063792
PubMed Central IDPMC6896789
Grant ListN01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK020541 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL102130 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0661
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
Manuscript Status: 
Published