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Cardiovascular disease risk factor burden and cognition: Implications of ethnic diversity within the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleCardiovascular disease risk factor burden and cognition: Implications of ethnic diversity within the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2019
AuthorsLamar M, Durazo-Arvizu RA, Sachdeva S, Pirzada A, Perreira KM, Rundek T, Gallo LC, Grober E, DeCarli C, Lipton RB, Tarraf W, González HM, Daviglus ML
JournalPLoS One
Volume14
Issue4
Paginatione0215378
Date Published2019
ISSN1932-6203
KeywordsAged, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cognition, Cohort Studies, Cultural Diversity, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Hypercholesterolemia, Hypertension, Linear Models, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Prevalence, Public Health, Risk Factors, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Hispanics/Latinos have some of the highest prevalence rates for cardiovascular disease risk factors, but stark differences exist by self-reported background. Cardiovascular disease risk factors negatively impact cognition in Hispanics/Latinos; less is known about these relationships by Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. We investigated cognitive associations with cardiovascular disease risk factor burden in a diverse cohort, the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.METHODS: Baseline data from this observational study of cardiovascular disease and its antecedents was collected from 2008-2011. We included 7,121 participants 45-74 years old from Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or South American backgrounds. Dichotomous indicators for hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and smoking were evaluated and totaled, with participants grouped by lowest (0-2), middle (3) or highest (4-5) burden. Cognitive testing included the Brief Spanish English Verbal Learning Test, letter fluency, and digit symbol substitution.RESULTS: In separate fully-adjusted linear regression models, lower fluency and digit symbol substitution performance were restricted to the highest compared to the lowest burden group; whereas the middle burden group displayed impaired memory performance compared to the lowest burden group (p-values≤0.05). Background interacted with burden for learning and memory performance. That is, the association of burden level (i.e., lowest, middle, or highest) with cognitive performance was modified by background (e.g., Mexicans vs Cuban).CONCLUSIONS: Hispanics/Latinos with higher levels of cardiovascular disease risk factor burden displayed lower levels of cognitive performance, with learning and memory performance modified by background.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0215378
Alternate JournalPLoS One
PubMed ID31009492
PubMed Central IDPMC6476505
Grant ListN01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K01 AG040192 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0360
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published