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Association between immigration status and anxiety, depression, and use of anxiolytic and antidepressant medications in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleAssociation between immigration status and anxiety, depression, and use of anxiolytic and antidepressant medications in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2019
AuthorsRoss J, Hua S, Perreira KM, Hanna DB, Castañeda SF, Gallo LC, Penedo FJ, Tarraf W, Hernandez R, Potler NVega, Talavera GA, Daviglus ML, Gonzalez F, Kaplan RC, Smoller-Wassertheil S
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume37
Pagination17-23.e3
Date Published2019 09
ISSN1873-2585
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Anti-Anxiety Agents, Antidepressive Agents, Anxiety, Cross-Sectional Studies, Depression, Emigrants and Immigrants, Female, Health Services Accessibility, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, mental health, Middle Aged, Public Health, Socioeconomic Factors, Undocumented Immigrants, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between undocumented immigration status and anxiety, depression, and use of anxiolytic or antidepressant medications in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of data collected between 2014 and 2017. Participants were categorized as U.S.-born citizens, naturalized citizens, documented noncitizens, or undocumented noncitizens. We calculated prevalence and prevalence ratios for anxiety, depression, and use of anxiolytic or antidepressant medication, by immigration status.RESULTS: Of 9257 participants, 1403 (15%) were undocumented noncitizens, 2872 (31%) were documented noncitizens, 3766 (41%) were naturalized citizens, and 1216 (13%) were U.S.-born citizens. Prevalence of anxiety was lower among undocumented than documented noncitizens (9 vs. 15%, P < .0001) but not significantly different in adjusted analyses. Prevalence of depression was similar among undocumented and documented noncitizens (20 vs. 24%, P = .07) and not significantly different in adjusted analyses. Among participants with depression, 7% of undocumented and 27% of documented noncitizens reported use of antidepressants (adjusted prevalence ratio 0.49, 95% CI 0.27-0.87).CONCLUSIONS: Undocumented noncitizens had similar likelihood of anxiety and depression, but lower likelihood of antidepressant use, compared with documented noncitizens. These results may reflect the resilience of an undocumented population facing multiple stressors but suggest that this group may be undertreated for depression.

DOI10.1016/j.annepidem.2019.07.007
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID31378561
PubMed Central IDPMC6755042
Grant ListK01 HL130712 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
K23 MH114752 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
K01 HL137557 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0664
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
Manuscript Status: 
Published